Mitchell Nathan

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CONTACTING US

Main Office

Educational Psychology
School of Education
UW-Madison
859 Education Sciences
1025 W. Johnson Street
MadisonWI  53706-1796

Tel: 608/262-3432
Fax: 608/262-0843

Email: edpsych@education.wisc.edu
or by contact form
 

Professor Mitchell Nathan

Profile Photo

Professor Mitchell Nathan

Professor
Educational Psychology (EdPsych)
Center on Education and Work (CEW)
Curriculum and Instruction (CI)
Wisconsin Center for Education Research (WCER)

1069 Educational Sciences  binoculars icon
1025 West Johnson Street
Madison, WI 53706-1706
Office: 608/262-0831
Fax: 608/262-0843

mnathan@wisc.edu
WEBSITE: Professional Bio

964 Educational Sciences  binoculars icon
1025 West Johnson Street
Madison, WI 53706-1706
Office: 608/263-0563

mnathan@wisc.edu
WEBSITE: Center on Education and Work (CEW)

Personal Biography

I have an electrical engineering degree (robotic systems and computer vision), PhD in cognitive psychology, and am full professor of educational psychology (Learning Sciences). I conduct classroom and laboratory based research on teaching and learning in STEM fields (Science, technology, engineering and mathematics).


Education

Ph D, Cognitive Psychology
University of Colorado-Boulder
Boulder, CO

BS, Electrical and Computer Engineering; Mathematics; and History, Robotics, computer science, quantitative history
Carnegie Mellon University
Pittsburgh, PA


 

 

Teaching Interests

Learning sciences; cognition and instruction; teacher education (educational psychology); mathematical thinking, learning and instruction; protocol analysis; embodied cognition; STEM education

Scheduled Teaching

  • Spring 2009 - Intro Learning Sciences II
    Course Prefix: 315, Course Number: 796, Section: 001, Maximum Credit Hours: 3, Course Level: Doctoral, Course Delivery Mode: Discussion
     
  • Fall 2008 - College Classroom (CIRTL)
    Course Number: 654, Section: 001, Maximum Credit Hours: 3, Course Level: Graduate, Course Delivery Mode: Discussion
     
  • Fall 2008 - Intro Learning Sciences I
    Course Prefix: 315, Course Number: 795, Section: 001, Maximum Credit Hours: 3, Course Level: Doctoral, Course Delivery Mode: Discussion
     

Research Interests

Learning sciences, cognition and instruction, STEM education, mathematics education, pre-college engineering engineering, classroom based research, student thinking, teacher knowledge and beliefs, teaching, gesture studies, discourse analysis, embodied cognition, educational technology

Grants and Sponsorships

  • 8/31/2013 - Amount: $2,000,000.00, "Tangibility For The Teaching, Learning, And Communicating Of Mathematics," Awarded By: National Science Foundation Research and Evaluation on Education in Science and Engineering (NSF-REESE), Grant Institution: National Science Foundation Research and Evaluation on Education in Science and Engineering (NSF-REESE), Sponsor Type: Federal, Mitchell J. Nathan, Principal; Martha Wagner Alibali, Co-Principal.
    Abstract: We propose research that takes advantage of technical advances in multi-modal and spatial analysis to develop new theories of embodied mathematical cognition and learning. Three university groups will conduct a coordinated series of empirical and design studies that focus on learning the mathematics of space and motion which is a domain that has wide-ranging relevance for what children need to learn in school, and that presents particularly interesting challenges for a theory of embodied cognition. Two major ideas from embodied cognition are especially relevant for the study of mathematical understanding: (1) Grounding of abstraction in perceptuo-motor activity. This conception shifts the locus of “thinking” from a central processor to a distributed web of perceptuo-motor activity situated within a physical and social setting; therefore, it suggests that to make meaning people ground seemingly abstract concepts in modality-specific, sensory-motor systems. (2) Cognition is for action. This tenet proposes that things, including mathematical symbols and representations, are understood by the actions we can perform with them, or by mentally simulating the actions that underlie or constitute them. The aim of our research is to advance understanding of basic questions about learning and teaching through the development of a theory of embodied mathematical cognition that can apply to a broad range of people, settings and activities. Such a theory, grounded in empirical studies, will help us to identify promising implications for mathematics teaching and learning as well as to articulate useful perspectives on the nature of mathematical knowledge for the technical workplace, for teachers, and for curriculum designers.
  • 2010-2013 - Amount: $655,000.00, "Director, Postdoctoral Fellowship Program In Mathematical Thinking, Learning And Instruction," Awarded By: U. S. Dept. of Education-Institute of Educational Sciences (IES), Grant Institution: U. S. Dept. of Education-Institute of Educational Sciences (IES), Sponsor Type: Federal, Mitchell J. Nathan, Principal.
    Abstract: There is a clear and recognized need for well-trained mathematics education researchers who are able to conduct scientifically based qualitative and quantitative research that addresses immediate and long-term questions about the efficacy of educational programs and policies, and who can provide an empirical basis for future designs of curricula, assessments, instruction, and learning environments. With funding from the US Department of Education's Institute of Education Sciences, we now offer a two-year interdisciplinary, postdoctoral training program, situated at the University of Wisconsin–Madison, which aims to increase postdoctoral capacity to conduct rigorous research in the topic area of mathematics education. The program provides recent graduates opportunities to experience a range of methods, including those from curriculum & instruction seeking to learn quantitative methods that support causal inference, as well as psychologists and other social scientists seeking to conduct studies in natural settings and collect, analyze, and interpret process-level data. The training program emphasizes the interdisciplinary nature of the mathematics education research opportunities at the University of Wisconsin–Madison. It addresses broad research interests, including: Exploratory research, basic processes in learning and instruction, development and innovation, efficacy and replication, and measurement.
  • 2009-2012 - Amount: $999,789.00, "How Do Instructional Gestures Support Students’ Mathematical Learning?," Awarded By: National Science Foundation, Grant Institution: National Science Foundation Research and Evaluation on Education in Science and Engineering (NSF-REESE), Sponsor Type: Federal, Mitchell J. Nathan, Co-Principal; Martha Wagner Alibali, Principal; Eric J. Knuth.
    Abstract: Mathematics lessons often focus on relations between mathematical ideas. Our previous work suggests that teachers’ communication about such relations is crucial for students’ learning about them. The purpose of the proposed research is to understand how variations in teachers’ communication about relations between mathematical ideas affect students’ learning. In the proposed work, we focus on teachers’ instructional gestures, with a specific focus on gestures that occur in instructional episodes that link related representations of mathematical information, in particular, gestures that serve to ground ideas in the physical environment or in familiar actions, experiences or representations. The research has three specific aims: • Aim 1. To investigate whether students’ learning is facilitated if the teacher grounds both (as compared to one or neither) of the to-be-linked ideas with gestures (Experiments 1 and 2); • Aim 2. To examine whether learning is facilitated if the teacher grounds the links using redundant rather than complementary gestures (Experiments 3 and 4); and • Aim 3. To examine whether gestures offer a “special” way to ground ideas, in the sense that they are more effective at doing so than other, non-gestural methods of grounding (Experiments 5 and 6). We will address each of these aims in two domains: early algebra, with a specific focus on the concepts of slope and intercept as they apply to linear functions; and inferential statistics, with a specific focus on confidence intervals (CIs) and their connections to concepts of variability and distinctions between sample and population means. This work will contribute to our scientific understanding of learning and instruction from an embodied cognition perspective. By experimentally manipulating the ways in which relations between mathematical ideas are conveyed, and exploring the consequences for learning, we will gain a deeper understanding of the cognitive processes involved in acquiring mathematical understanding.
  • 2007-2011 - Amount: $978,000.00, "Aligning Educational Experiences With Ways Of Knowing Engineering," Awarded By: National Science Foundation Engineering Program (NSF-EEP), Sponsor Type: Federal, Mitchell J. Nathan, Co-Principal; S.Courter, Principal; A.Phelps.
    Abstract: This is a collaborative project between Education and Engineering faculty to explore the developmental trajectory of engineering education, and investigate the most basic question of how students develop their identities as engineers and interests in relation to the engineering community, and whether the mathematics and science educational experiences we make as pre-requisite to engineering are suitable.
  • 2006-2009 - Amount: $683,753.00, "Does Visual Scaffolding Facilitate Students’ Mathematics Learning? Evidence From Early Algebra," Awarded By: Institute of Education Sciences, Eric J. Knuth, Co-Principal; Martha Alibali, Principal; Mitchell J. Nathan, Co-Principal.
  • 2006-2009 - Amount: $982,736.00, "The Role Of Visual Scaffolding In Students' Mathematics Learning: Evidence From Early Algebra," Awarded By: U.S. Dept. of Education-Institute of Educational Sciences (IES), Grant Institution: Northeastern Illinois University, Sponsor Type: Federal, Mitchell J. Nathan, Co-Principal; M.W. Alibali, Principal; E.Knuth; R.B. Church.
    Abstract: Investigates the types of gesture-based communication teachers use during natural instruction, its impact on student learning, and the practicality of teaching teachers to adopt effective gesture practices during classroom instruction.
  • 9/30/2007 - Amount: $288,750.00, "Staar Teacher Professional Development Project," Awarded By: National Science Foundation, Grant Institution: University of Wisconsin-Madison, Sponsor Type: Federal, Mitchell J. Nathan, Principal.
    Abstract: STAAR TEACHER PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT PROJECT
  • 2001-2007 - Amount: $5,798,281.00, "Understanding And Cultivating The Transition From Arithmetic And Algebraic Reasoning," Awarded By: NSF, Us Dept of Education - OERI, NIH - NICHHD, Grant Institution: Interagency Education Research Initiative (IERI), Sponsor Type: Federal, Mitchell J. Nathan, Principal; H.Borko; H.Kupermintz; J.Frykholm; S.Derry; M.W. Alibali; E.Knuth; K.R. Koedinger.
    Abstract: As PI over the entire 3-campus grant, I manage the activities of all the separate awards under the collaborative arrangement, oversee report filing and communications among the separate campus PIs and separate research tiers, and manage funding changes.
  • 2001-2006 - Amount: $5,798,281.00, "Understanding And Cultivating The Transition From Arithmetic To Algebraic Reasoning," Awarded By: IERI (NSF, NICHD, DOE), Eric J. Knuth, Co-Principal; Mitchell J. Nathan, Principal; Martha Alibali, Co-Principal; Sharon J. Derry, Co-Principal.
  • Amount: $9,998,406.00, "National Center For Cognition And Mathematics Instruction," Awarded By: U. S. Dept. of Education-Institute of Education Sciences, Grant Institution: U. S. Dept. of Education-Institute of Education Sciences, Sponsor Type: Federal, Mitchell J. Nathan, Co-Principal.
    Abstract: Center brings together leading experts with the goal of redesigning components of a widely-adopted middle school mathematics curriculum – Connected Mathematics Project (CMP) – using established, evidence-based principles derived from randomized experimental studies in classrooms and controlled laboratory settings. Our objective is to enhance the conditions of instruction and improve learning outcomes for important and challenging math concepts and skills. We will focus on four primary design principles: (1) combining graphics with verbal descriptions in ways that promote the integration of concepts, (2) structuring practice to interleave worked examples, (3) carefully spacing the learning of critical content and skills over time, and (4) using focused feedback on quizzes and homework to promote student learning.

Publications

  • Wagner, a.M., & Nathan, M.J. (2011). Gestures in the classroom: What’s the point? Developmental Cognitive Science Goes to School, (pp. 219-234). Routledge.
  • Nathan, M.J., & Atwood, A.K. (2011). Guidance counselors’ beliefs and expectations about high school students’ precollege engineering preparation. Proceedings of the American Society of Engineering Education (ASEE) 2011, American Society of Engineering Education (ASEE).
  • Nathan, M.J., & Wagner, A.M. (2011). How gesture use enables intersubjectivity in the classroom. In G. Stam & M. Ishino (Eds.), Integrating gestures: The interdisciplinary nature of gesture, (pp. 257-266). John Benjamins Publishing Company.
  • Nathan, M.J., Atwood, A.K., & Phelps, L.A. (2011). How professional development in Project Lead the Way changes high school STEM teachers’ beliefs about engineering education. Journal of Pre-College Engineering Education Research. 1(1), 15-29.
    Online Publication/Abstract
    Abstract: This quasi-experimental study measured the impact of Project Lead the Way (PLTW) instruction and professional development training on the views and expectations regarding engineering learning, instruction and career success of nascent pre-college engineering teachers. PLTW teachers’ initial and changing views were compared to the views exhibited by a control group of high school STEM teachers. The primary instrument was the Engineering Beliefs and Expectation Instruments for Teachers (EEBEI-T), which included Likert scale items, contextualized judgments about fictional student vignettes, and demographic items. Teachers’ baseline survey responses, on average, revealed the importance academic achievement on teachers’ decision making about who should enroll in future engineering classes and their predictions of who would be most likely to succeed in an engineering career. When making implicit comparisons between students who differed by SES, teachers generally favored enrollment and predicted more career success of high SES students. SES was excluded as a factor in the judgments of all participating teachers when explicitly probed, however. Preexisting group differences showed that budding PLTW teachers reported on STEM integration in their classes with greater frequency than control teachers, while control teachers agreed more strongly about the pre-requisite role of high scholastic achievement for engineering studies. Finally, an analysis of teachers’ changing views indicated that nascent PLTW teachers increased their reporting of effective STEM integration over time, above and beyond pre-existing group differences and re-testing effects. In light of these data we explore the challenges of implementing effective STEM integration in high school classrooms, examine issues of attracting underrepresented students to engineering, and discuss some of the inherent tensions of engineering education at the K-12 level.
  • Nathan, M.J., & Wagner, A.M. (2011). Modal engagements in precollege engineering: Tracking math and science across symbols, sketches, software, silicone and wood. Proceedings of the American Society of Engineering Education (ASEE) 2011, American Society of Engineering Education (ASEE).
  • Nathan, M.J., Phelps, L.A., & Atwood, A.K. (2011). STEM integration in a precollege course in digital electronics: Analysis of the enacted curriculum. Proceedings of the American Society of Engineering Education (ASEE) 2011, American Society of Engineering Education (ASEE).
  • Nathan, M.J., & Alibali, M.W. (in press). How gesture use enables intersubjectivity in the classroom. Integrating Gestures. John Benjamins.
    Online Publication/Abstract
  • Prevost, A., Nathan, M.J., Stein, B., & Phelps, L.A. (2010, June). The enacted curriculum: A video based analysis of instruction and learning in high school engineering classrooms. Proceedings of the American Society of Engineering Education (ASEE) 2010, ASEE.
  • Nathan, M.J. (in press). Technology supports for acquiring mathematics. International Encyclopedia of Education, 3rd Edition. Oxford: Elsevier.
    Online Publication/Abstract
  • Nathan, M.J., & Alibali, M.W. (2010). Learning sciences. Wiley Interdisciplinary Reviews: Cognitive Science. 1(3), 329-345.
  • Nathan, M.J. Instituting change in classroom discourse structure: human and computer-based motif analyses. Manuscript in preparation. Madison, WI: Wisconsin Center for Education Research.
    Online Publication/Abstract
  • Nathan, M.J., Kim, S., & Eilam, B. (2009). Methodological Considerations for the Study of Intersubjectivity Among Participants of a Dialogic Mathematics Classroom. In Schwarz, B. B., Hershkowitz, R., & Dreyfus, T. (Eds.), Transformation of knowledge through classroom interaction, (pp. 244-260). New York: Routledge.
    Online Publication/Abstract
  • Bieda, K.N., & Nathan, M.J. Representational disfluency in algebra: Evidence from student gestures and speech. Unpublished Manuscript, University of Wisconsin, Madison. 41(5), 637- 650.
    Online Publication/Abstract
  • Nathan, M.J. (2009). Unresolved contradiction as a condition for promoting socially mediated learning: A comment on Howe. Human Development. 52(4), 246-250.
    Online Publication/Abstract
  • Phelps, L.A., Nathan, M.J., Atwood, A., Prevost, A., & Tran, N. (2009, June). Changes in high school teachers’ beliefs about engineering preparation: A quasi-experimental study. Frontiers in Education (FIE) 2009, ASEE Publications.
    Online Publication/Abstract
  • Nathan, M.J., Tran, N., Atwood, A., Prevost, A., & Phelps, L.A. (2009, June). High school teachers’ beliefs about engineering preparation. Proceedings of the American Society of Engineering Education (ASEE) 2009, ASEE Publications.
    Online Publication/Abstract
  • Prevost, A., Nathan, M.J., Stein, B., Tran, N., & Phelps, L.A. (2009, June). Integration of mathematics in pre-college engineering: The search for explicit connections. Proceedings of the American Society of Engineering Education (ASEE) 2009, ASEE.
    Online Publication/Abstract
  • Nathan, M.J. (2008). An embodied cognition perspective on symbols, grounding, and instructional gesture. In M. DeVega, A.M. Glenberg, & A.C. Graesser (Eds.), Symbols, Embodiment and Meaning: A Debate, (pp. 375-396). Oxford, England: Oxford University Press.
    Online Publication/Abstract
  • Otero, V.K., & Nathan, M.J. (in press). Pre-Service elementary teachers' views of their students' prior knowledge in science. Journal of Research in Science Teaching. 45(4), 497-523.
    Abstract: This is the top-ranked journal in science education. This qualitative study documents the preconceptions held by pre-service elementary teachers (N=61) about the nature and role that elementary students' prior knowledge of scientific phenomena plays in students' learning and in evidence-based instruction. It presents a Vygotskian perspective on the shifting nature of teacher preconceptions as teachers develop and understanding of formative assessment.
  • Grant, T., & Nathan, M.J. (2008). Students' conceptual metaphors influence their statistical reasoning. WCER Working Paper Series No. 2008-5. Madison, WI: Wisconsin Center for Education Research.
    Online Publication/Abstract
  • Nathan, M.J., Tran, N., Phelps, L.A., & Prevost, A. (2008). The structure of high school academic and pre-engineering curricula: Mathematics. Proceedings of the American Society of Engineering Education (ASEE), Washington DC: ASEE Publications.
  • Koedinger, K.R., Alibali, M., & Nathan, M.J. (in press). Trade-offs between grounded and abstract representations: Evidence from algebra problem solving. Cognitive Science. 32(2), 366-397.
    Abstract: This is a top-tier cognitive science journal. Two experimental (quantitative) studies replicate earlier findings of Nathan & Koedinger (2000; Koedinger & Nathan, 2004) showing that the verbal advantage of algebraic reasoning holds for both low performing (N=153) and very high performing (N=65) college students on beginning algebra problems; and that a symbolic advantage is seen later, when the complexity of algebraic relations increases.
  • Nathan, M.J., & Kim, S. (2007). Pattern generalization with graphs and words: A cross-sectional and longitudinal analysis of middle school students' representational fluency. Mathematical Thinking and Learning. 9(3), 193-219.
    Abstract: This is a top-tier math education journal. This way peer-reviewed for a special issue. This study analyzes both 3-year cross-sectional (N=372) and 3-year longitudinal (N=81) quantitative data to test claims in the literature about middle school students' initial and developing skill with algebraic representations. A new, empirically based developmental model of representational fluency emerges that provides specific curricular and instructional recommendations.
  • Nathan, M.J., & Kim, S. (2007). Regulation of teacher elicitations and the impact on student participation and cognition. WCER Working Paper Series No. 2004-04. Madison, WI: Wisconsin Center for Educational Research.
    Online Publication/Abstract
  • Alibali, M.W., & Nathan, M.J. (2007). Teachers' gestures as a means of scaffolding students' understanding: Evidence from an early algebra lesson. In R. Goldman, R. Pea, B.J. Barron, S. Derry (Eds.), Video Research in the Learning Sciences, (pp. 349-365). Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum, Associates.
  • Nathan, M.J., Eilam, B., & Kim, S. (2007). To disagree, we must also agree: How intersubjectivity structures and perpetuates discourse in a mathematics classroom. Journal of the Learning Sciences. 16(4), 525-565.
    Abstract: This is the top-ranked journal in my field. This qualitative/mixed methods study views classroom learning as a socially mediated activity predicated on establishing and maintaining common ground. It documents the social (as opposed to individual level) accumulation of knowledge as manifest in the changes in how representations are used by middle school math students to convey their ideas and solve a mutual problem that involves 3D reasoning.
  • Nathan, M.J. (2006). Reflecting on the role of the hand, head and soul of America: The mind at work. Mind, Culture and Activity. 13(1), 74-77.
    Abstract: Unsolicited, peer-reviewed book review that examines how so-called "blue collar" work is rich with complex cognitive demands.
  • Nathan, M.J., & Jackson, K. (2006). Reframing the role of Boolean classes in qualitative research from an embodied cognition perspective. Proceedings of the International Conference on the Learning Sciences (ICLS), Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.
  • French, A., & Nathan, M.J. (2006). Under the microscope of research and into the classroom: Reflections on early algebra learning and instruction. In J. O. Masingila (Eds.), Teachers Engaged in Research, (pp. 49-68). Greenwich, CT: Information Age Publishing.
  • Nathan, M.J., & Knuth, E.J. A study of whole classroom mathematical discourse and teacher change. Unpublished Manuscript, University of Wisconsin, Madison. 21(2), 175-207.

Presentations

  • Nathan, M.J., & Johnson, C.V. (2011). Gesture as model enactment (GAME): Evidence when learning from text, American Educational Research Association (AERA) Annual Meeting, American Educational Research Association (AERA), New Orleans, LA.
  • Nathan, M.J., Alibali, M.W., Wolfgram, M., Srisuruchan, R., & Felton, M. (2011). Modal Engagements in High School STEM Classrooms: Tracking the 'Where' and 'What' of Mathematics Across Ecological Contexts, American Educational Research Association (AERA) Annual Meeting, American Educational Research Association, New Orleans, LA.
  • Courter, S., Anderson, K., Nathan, M.J., A., P.L., Nathans-Kelly, T., Grobowski, C.N., McGlamery, T., Prevost, A., Stein, B., & Atwood, A. (2011). Moving towards the intended, explicit, and authentic: Addressing critical misalignments in engineering learning within secondary and university education, ASEE 2011, American Society for Engineering Education, Vancouver, BC.
  • Moore, T., & Nathan, M.J. (2010). Getting an angle on mathematics in a high school engineering activity, P-12 Engineering and Design Education Research Summit, Institute for P-12 Engineering Research and Learning, Seaside, OR.
  • Nathan, M.J. (2010). How professional development changes high school STEM teachers' beliefs, P-12 Engineering and Design Education Research Summit, Institute for P-12 Engineering Research and Learning, Seaside, OR.
  • Nathan, M.J. (2010). Discussant for "social construction of mathematical meaning through collaboration and argumentation, International Conference of the Learning Sciences, Chicago, IL.
  • Nathan, M.J., & Johnson, C.V. (2010). Drawing inferences: How gestures and speech convey students' mental models of dynamic processes depicted in scientific drawings, International Conference of the Learning Sciences, Chicago, IL.
  • Nathan, M.J., Rummel, N., & Hay, K.E. (2010). Growing the learning sciences: Brand or big tent? Implications for graduate education, International Conference of the Learning Sciences, Chicago, IL.
  • Tran, N., Nathan, M.J., & Nathan, M. (2010). An empirical comparison of results between hand-matched and propensity score matched groups in a quasi-experiment, American Educational Research Association (AERA) Annual Meeting, American Educational Research Association (AERA), Denver, CO.
  • Nathan, M.J. (2010). Rising to the challenge of STEM education: Implications for teaching, Region 11 Math and Science Teacher Academy, Regioan 11 Math and Science Teacher Academy, Minnesota.
  • Nathan, M.J. (2010). What is engineering practice and how do students learn it?, University of Wisconsin-Madison College of Engineering, University of Wisconsin-Madison College of Engineering, Madison, WI.
  • Halverson, E., & Nathan, M.J. (2010). Curriculum design: The backwards design process, University of Wisconsin-Madison School of Medicine and Public Health Annual "Medical Education Day", University of Wisconsin-Madison School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, WI.
  • Nathan, M.J. (2010). Rising to the challenge of STEM education, Keynote Address to the Opening Ceremony of the University of Minnesota STEM Education Center, University of Minnesota, College of Education and Human Development, University of Minnesota.
  • Nathan, M.J. (2010). Conducting multidisciplinary research in engineering education, Presentation to the Multidisciplinary Program in Education Sciences, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL.
  • Nathan, M.J., Presenter & Author (2009). Career and technical education as a context for improving mathematics achievement, European Association for Research on Learning and Instruction 2009 biannual meeting, EARLI - European Association for Research on Learning and Instruction, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
  • Nathan, M.J., Presenter & Author, Alibali, M.W., & Knuth, E.J. (2009). Students’ Prior Knowledge as Obstacles to Algebraic Reasoning., European Association for Research on Learning and Instruction 2009 biannual meeting, EARLI - European Association for Research on Learning and Instruction, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
  • Nathan, M.J., Presenter & Author, KIm, S., & Grant, T. (2009). Tracking Changes in Classroom Discourse Structure Using Human and Computer-Based Motif Analyses, European Association for Research on Learning and Instruction 2009 biannual meeting, EARLI - European Association for Research on Learning and Instruction, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
  • Nathan, M.J., Presenter & Author, Oliver, K., Prevost, A., Tran, N., & Phelps, L.A. (2009). Classroom learning and instruction in high school pre-engineering settings: A video-based analysis, ASEE 2009, American Society for Engineering Education, Austin, TX.
  • Nathan, M.J., Tran, N., Atwood, A., Prevost, A., & Phelps, L.A. (2009). High school teachers’ beliefs about engineering preparation., ASEE 2009, American Society for Engineering Education, Austin, TX.
  • Prevost, A., Presenter & Author, Nathan, M.J., Presenter & Author, Tran, N., & Phelps, L.A. (2009). Integration of mathematics in pre-engineering: The search for explicit connections, ASEE 2009, American Society for Engineering Education, Austin, TX.
  • Nathan, M.J., Presenter Only, & Alibali, M.W. (2009). Grounding and Action in an Embodied Approach to Mathematical Teaching, Learning and Communicating, Embodied Mathematics Advisory Board, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI.
  • Nathan, M.J., Kim, S., & Grant, T. (2009). Instituting change in classroom discourse structure, American Educational Research Association (AERA) Annual Meeting, American Educational Research Association (AERA), San Diego, CA.
  • Nathan, M.J., Presenter Only (2009). Chair for the Working Group “Cognitive Science and Education.”, American Educational Research Association Annual Meeting, American Educational Research Association (AERA), San Diego, CA.
  • Nathan, M.J., Presenter & Author, & Johnson, C.V., Presenter & Author (2009). Gestures and mental models, American Educational Research Association Annual Meeting, American Educational Research Association (AERA), San Diego, CA.
  • Nathan, M.J., Presenter & Author, KIm, S., Author Only, & Grant, T., Author Only (2009). Instituting change in classroom discourse structure: Human and computer-based motif analyses, American Educational Research Association Annual Meeting, American Educational Research Association (AERA), San Diego, CA.
  • Nathan, M.J., & Johnson, C.V. (2009). Gestures and mental models, Poster presented at the American Educational Research Association (AERA) Annual Meeting, American Educational Research Association (AERA), San Diego, CA.
  • Alibali, M.W., Presenter Only, Church, R., Nathan, M.J., Knuth, E.J., Wolfgram, M.S., Jacobs, S.A., Hostetter, A., & Johnson, C.V. (2009). How Teachers Link Mathematical Ideas in Instructional Communication., Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD) Biennial Meeting, Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD), Denver, CO.
  • Jacobs, S., Presenter Only, Church, R., Nathan, M.J., Knuth, E.J., Wolfgram, M.S., & Alibali, M.W. (2009). How Teachers Use Representational Gestures in the Classroom to Teach Algebraic Concepts, Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD) Biennial Meeting, Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD), Denver, CO.
  • Nathan, M.J., Presenter Only (2009). Understanding and cultivating algebraic reasoning, Invited Talk, Lawrence University Science Hall Colloquium Series, with cosponsorship from the Education Department., Appleton, WI.
  • Nathan, M.J. (2009). Understanding and cultivating algebraic reasoning, Lawrence University Science Hall Colloquium Series, Lawrence University, Appleton, WI.
  • Nathan, M.J., Tran, N., Phelps, L.A., & Prevost, A. (2008). The structure of high school academic and pre-engineering curricula: Mathematics, Paper Presentation to the American Society of Engineering Education 2008, American Society of Engineering Education, Pittsburgh, PA.
  • Nathan, M.J. (2008). The role of visual scaffolding in students' mathematics learning: Evidence from early algebra, Poster presentation to the Third Annual Research Conference of the US Department of Education-Institute of Educational Sciences, US Department of Education-Institute of Educational Sciences, Washington, DC.
  • Nathan, M.J. (2008). Chair for "Embodiment of Education" (Arthur Glenberg, Presenter), American Educational Research Association (AERA) Annual Meeting, American Educational Research Association (AERA), New York, NY.
  • Nathan, M.J. (2008). Chair for "Tangible Media and Mathematical Imagination" (Ricardo Nemirovsky, Presenter), American Educational Research Association (AERA) Annual Meeting, American Educational Research Association (AERA), New York, NY.
  • Nathan, M.J. (2008). Mapping 'Geography of Opportunity' in a Large-Scale Randomized Experiment on Enhancing Mathematics with Technology, Discussant for American Educational Research Association (AERA) Annual Meeting, American Educational Research Association (AERA), New York, NY.
  • Nathan, M.J. (2008). Math education meets gesture studies: How mathematics education adapts gesture studies to its own purposes, Discussant for American Educational Research Association Annual Meeting, American Educational Research Association (AERA), New York, NY.
  • Nathan, M.J. (2008). Expert blind spot in teacher cognition, UTeach Discovery Learning Speaker Series, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX.
  • Nathan, M.J. (2007). Gesture and materialistic epistemologies in reasoning and scientific discovery, Presentation to the Center for Advanced Studies-Behavior Sciences, Center for Advanced Studies-Behavior Sciences, Palo Alto, CA.
  • Alibali, M.W., & Nathan, M.J. (2007). A symposium entitled "Mechanisms by which Gestures Contribute to Establishing Common Ground: Evidence from Teaching and Learning", International Society for Gesture Studies (ISGS) Third International Conference, International Society for Gesture Studies (ISGS), Evanston, IL.
  • Bieda, K., & Nathan, M.J. (2007). Going beyond: What gesture shows us about students' notions of graphs, Poster presentation to the International Society for Gesture Studies (ISGS) Third International Conference, International Society for Gesture Studies, Evanston, IL.
  • Woods, D., Nathan, M.J., & Bieda, K. (2007). Data session on Transana use for qualitative and quantitative gesture analysis, Presentation to the International Society for Gesture Studies (ISGS) Third International Conference, International Society for Gesture Studies (ISGS), Evanston, IL.
  • Nathan, M.J. (2007). Scaling up through knowledge accumulation, Presentation to the National Science Foundation, National Science Foundation, Arlington, VA.
  • Nathan, M.J., & Alibali, M.W. (2007). Giving a hand to the mind: Gesture enables intersubjectivity in classroom, Symposium entitled "Mechanisms by which Gestures Contribute to Establishing Common Ground: Evidence from Teaching and Learning presented to the International Society for Gesture Studies (ISGS) Third International Conference, International Society for Gesture Studies (ISGS), Evanston, IL.
  • Nathan, M.J. (2007). Chair of "The Nature and Role of Tasks that Foster Learning in Mathematics Teacher Education", American Educational Research Association (AERA) Annual Meeting, American Educational Research Association (AERA), Chicago, IL.
  • Nathan, M.J. (2007). Discussant for symposium entitled "Using Qualitative Research Methods to Understand Engaged Learning in Online Communities", American Educational Research Association (AERA) Annual Meeting, American Educational Research Association (AERA), Chicago, IL.
  • Nathan, M.J., Eilam, B., & Kim, S. (2007). Paper presentation: Intersubjectivity structures discourse in socially mediated mathematics learning: To disagree, we must also agree", American Educational Research Association (AERA) Annual Meeting, American Educational Research Association (AERA), Chicago, IL.
  • Grant, T.S., & Nathan, M.J. (2007). Students' conceptual metaphors influence their statistical reasoning about confidence intervals, American Educational Research Association (AERA) Annual Meeting, American Educational Research Association (AERA), Chicago, IL.
  • Hattikudur, S., Prather, R., Knuth, E., Nathan, M.J., & Alibali, M.W. (2007). Poster presentation: "Studies in mathematics teaching and learning", Poster presentation at the American Educational Research Association (AERA) Annual Meeting, American Educational Research Association (AERA), Chicago, IL.
  • Hattikudur, S., Prather, R.W., Asquith, P., Knuth, E., Nathan, M.J., & Alibali, M.W. (2007). Poster presentation: Graphing slope and intercept in middle school, Poster presentation at the Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development, Society for Research in Child Development, Boston, MA.
  • Alibali, M.W., & Nathan, M.J. (2007). Gestures and embodied mathematical cognition, Presentation at the American Educational Research Association (AERA) Annual Meeting, American Educational Research Association (AERA), Chicago, IL.
  • Nathan, M.J. (2007). How intersubjectivity structures and perpetuates discourse in a socially mediated mathematics learning environment, Presentation to the Workshop on Guided Construction of Knowledge in Classrooms, University of Haifa School of Education, Jerusalem, Israel.
  • Nathan, M.J. (2007). Expert blind spot in teacher cognition, Presentation to the University of Haifa Mathematics Education Program, University of Haifa, Mount Carmel, Haifa, Israel.
  • Nathan, M.J. (2007). To disagree, we must also agree: How intersubjectivity structures and perpetuates discourse in a mathematics classroom, Presentation to the University of Haifa School of Education, University of Haifa School of Education, Mount Carmel, Haifa, Israel.
  • Nathan, M.J. (2006). To disagree, we must also agree: How intersubjectivity structures and perpetuates discourse in a mathematics classroom, Presentation to the University of Wisconsin Learning Sciences Colloquium, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI.
  • Nathan, M.J. (2006). Discussion of "epistemic games and scaffolding", Presentation to the International Conference of the Learning Sciences (ICLS), International Conference of the Learning Sciences (ICLS), Bloomington, IN.
  • Nathan, M.J. (2006). Learning sciences research at the University of Wisconsin, Presentation to the WCER 10-year Review Panel, Wisconsin Center for Education Research, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI.
  • Jackson, K., & Nathan, M.J. (2006). Paper presentation entitled 'Boolean Logic and Qualitative Research" to the Session on "The Ethics of Embodiment", The Second International Congress of Qualitative Inquiry, International Congress of Qualitative Inquiry, University of Illinois-Urbana, Champaign, IL.
  • Nathan, M.J. (2006). Learning science and the science of learning, Wisconsin Symposium on Human Biology, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI.
  • Nathan, M.J., & Knuth, E. (2006). Jim Kaput's Legacy and Impact on Mathematics Education, Learning Technology and Educational Reform, American Educational Research Association (AERA) Annual Meeting, American Educational Research Association (AERA), San Francisco, CA.
  • Nathan, M.J., & Kim, S. (2006). How teacher use of mitigated feedback promotes classroom learning, Paper Presentation at the American Educational Research Association (AERA) Annual Meeting, American Educational Research Association (AERA), San Francisco, CA.
  • Bieda, K., & Nathan, M.J. (2006). Middle-school students' use of speech and gesture in pattern-generalization tasks involving graphs: Evidence that bounded views influence performance, Poster Presentation at the American Educational Research Association (AERA) Annual Meeting, American Educational Research Association (AERA), San Francisco, CA.
  • Nathan, M.J. (2006). Research in the U.S. on learning and teaching in mathematics science, Invited Talk to the Research Institute of Science Education, Hosted by Professor LUO Xingkai, Professor of Physics and Director of the Research Institute of Science Education, Guangxi Normal University, China.
  • Nathan, M.J. (2005). Symbols and grounding in instructional settings, Presentation to "Symbols, Embodiment, and Meaning: A Workshop and Debate, Hosted by Manuelo DeVega, Art Glenberg, and Art Graesser, University of La Laguna, Tenerife, Spain.
  • Nathan, M.J. (2005). Teachers' use of grounded communication, Presentation to the School of Education, Hosted by Professor John Clement, University of Massachusetts-Amherst, Amherst, MA.
  • Nathan, M.J. (2005). Further results supporting the transition from arithmetic to algebraic reasoning, Poster presentation to the Interagency Education Research Initiative (IERI) meeting, Interagency Education Research Initiative (IERI), Washington, DC.
  • Nathan, M.J., & Halverson, E. (2005). How students learn: Thinking, teaching and instructional design, Presentation to the University of Wisconsin, Madison Teaching Academy, University of Wisconsin, Madison Teaching Academy, Madison, WI.
  • Nathan, M.J., & Kim, S. (2005). How teacher mitigated feedback fosters classroom learning, Paper Presentation to the Supporting the Transition from Arithmetic to Algebraic Reasoning (STAAR) Annual Meeting, Supporting the Transition from Arithmetic to Algebraic Reasoning (STAAR) Group, Estes Park, CO.
  • Nathan, M.J., & Kim, S. (2005). Representational fluency, Paper Presentation to the Supporting the Transition from Arithmetic to Algebraic Reasoning (STAAR) Annual Meeting, Supporting the Transition from Arithmetic to Algebraic Reasoning (STAAR) Group, Estes Park, CO.
  • Nathan, M.J., & Bieda, K. (2005). Revealing students' understanding of graphs through gesture and metaphor, Paper presentation to the Supporting the Transition from Arithmetic to Algebraic Reasoning (STAAR) Annual Meeting, Supporting the Transition from Arithmetic to Algebraic Reasoning (STAAR) Group, Estes Park, CO.
  • Nathan, M.J. (2005). Discussant for "Advanced Technologies for Learning", American Educational Research Association (AERA) Annual Meeting, American Educational Research Association (AERA), Montreal, Canada.
  • Nathan, M.J. (2005). Discussant for "Attending to Student Thinking in Mathematics Teaching", American Educational Research Association (AERA) Annual Meeting, American Educational Research Association (AERA), Montreal, Canada.
  • Alibali, M.W., & Nathan, M.J. (2005). Paper presentation: Teachers use gestures to link multiple representations of mathematical information in "Gestures and Embodied Action in Teaching", American Educational Research Association (AERA) Annual Meeting, American Educational Research Association (AERA), Montreal, Canada.
  • Nathan, M.J., & Jackson, K. (2005). The Impact of Boolean operators on tool use: An embodied cognition perspectice, Presentation to The Second Conference on Teaching Qualitative Methods, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI.
  • Nathan, M.J. (2004). Supporting the transition from arithmetic to algebraic reasoning, Poster presentation at the Interagency Education Research Initiative (IERI) meeting, Interagency Education Research Initiative (IERI), Washington, DC.
  • Nathan, M.J. (2004). Chair and Organizer of Symposium: Supporting Middle School Teachers to Assist Students Make the Transition from Arithmetic to Algebraic Reasoning, American Educational Research Association (AERA) Annual Meeting, American Educational Research Association (AERA), San Diego, CA.
  • Nathan, M.J., Koedinger, K.R., & Alibali, M.W. (2004). Presentation: Confronting Teachers' Beliefs about Algebra Development: Investigating an Approach for Professional Development, American Educational Research Association (AERA) Annual Meeting, American Educational Research Association (AERA), San Diego, CA.
  • Kupermintz, H., & Nathan, M.J. (2004). Presentation: Developmental Differences in Representational Fluency: Evidence for Relational and Instance-based Methods for Reasoning about Patterns, American Educational Research Association (AERA) Annual Meeting, American Educational Research Association (AERA), San Diego, CA.
  • Koedinger, K.R., Nathan, M.J., & Alibali, M.W. (2004). Presentation: Teachers' Knowledge and Beliefs about Students' Development of Algebraic Reasoning, American Educational Research Association (AERA) Annual Meeting, American Educational Research Association (AERA), San Diego, CA.
  • Nathan, M.J. (2003). Technology's other role in SMET education: How technology design and use can support science and mathematics education (and why we tend to dismiss such approaches), Presentation at Northwestern University, School of Education and Social Policy, Northwestern University, School of Education and Social Policy, Evanston, IL.
  • Otero, V., & Nathan, M.J. (2003). Paper Discussion: Elementary Pre-service Teachers' Initial and Changing Views about Students' Prior Knowledge and Collaborative Learning, American Educational Research Association (AERA) Annual Meeting, American Educational Research Association (AERA), Chicago, IL.
  • Nathan, M.J., & Petrosino, A. (2003). Presentation: Views of Algebra Development Among Pre-service Teachers with Advanced and Basic Mathematics Knowledge: Evidence for Expert Blind Spot, American Educational Research Association (AERA) Annual Meeting, American Educational Research Association (AERA), Chicago, IL.
  • Nathan, M.J. (2003). Expert blind spot in teacher cognition, Presentation at University of Illinois-Chicago, Cognitive Psychology Department, University of Illinois-Chicago, Cognitive Psychology Department, Chicago, IL.
  • Nathan, M.J. (2003). The formal and the physical: Contrasting views of conceptual development in science learning, University of Wisconsin-Madison Development Psychology Brown Bag Series, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI.
  • Nathan, M.J. (2002). "What do we know and need to know about faciliated online learning for teacher professional development", Discussant for "What do we know and need to know about faciliated online learning for teacher professional development, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Wisconsin Center for Education Research, Madison, WI.
  • Nathan, M.J. (2002). Discussion of 'teacher education and technology use within the STEP Project', Discussion of 'teacher education and technology use within the STEP Project', International Conference on the Learning Sciences, Seattle, WA.
  • Nathan, M.J. (2002). Presentation: Discussion of "Collaborative Technologies: A European Perspective", American Educational Research Association (AERA) Annual Meeting, American Educational Research Association (AERA), New Orleans, LA.
  • Nathan, M.J. (2002). Presentation: Discussion of "The Many Facets of Algebra", American Educational Research Association (AERA) Annual Meeting, American Educational Research Association (AERA), New Orleans, LA.
  • Nathan, M.J. (2001). The evolution of a theory of manipulatives design intended to cultivate abstract reasoning in mathematics, "Converging on Cognition," University of Colorado Institute of Cognitive Science, University of Coloardo Institute of Cognitive Science.
  • Nathan, M.J., Koedinger, K.R., & Alibali, M. (2001). The Expert Blind Spot: When Content Knowledge and Pedagogical Content Knowledge Collide, American Educational Research Association (AERA) Annual Meeting, American Educational Research Association (AERA), Seattle, WA.
  • Masarik, K., & Nathan, M.J. (2001). The Role of Problem Design When Eliciting Middle School Students' Intuitive Algebraic Problem-solving Strategies, American Educational Research Association (AERA) Annual Meeting, American Educational Research Association (AERA), Seattle, WA.
  • Masarik, D.K., & Nathan, M.J. (2000). Presentation: How Student Discourse Can Influence Student Learning and Classroom Instruction: A Case Study of Pattern Generalization in a Sixth Grade Mathematics Class, American Educational Research Association (AERA) Annual Meeting, American Educational Research Association (AERA), New Orleans, LA.
  • Nathan, M.J., & Long, S. (2000). Presentation: Mathematics Textbooks: Are They the Seeds of Teachers' Misconceptions?, American Educational Research Association (AERA) Annual Meeting, American Educational Research Association (AERA), New Orleans, LA.
  • Nathan, M.J. (2000). Presentation: Teachers Crafting Their Own Professional Development for Technology in the Content Areas, American Educational Research Association (AERA) Annual Meeting, American Educational Research Association (AERA), New Orleans, LA.
  • Nathan, M.J., & Kalmon, S. (2000). Presentation: The Model for Sustainable Professional Development, American Educational Research Association (AERA) Annual Meeting, American Educational Research Association (AERA), New Orleans, LA.
  • Koedinger, K.R., Alibali, M., & Nathan, M.J. (1999). A Developmental Model of Students' Early Algebra Competency, American Educational Research Association (AERA) Annual Meeting, American Educational Research Association (AERA), Montreal, Canada.
  • Nathan, M.J. (1999). An Instructional Theory for Early Algebra that Incorporates Research on Student Thinking, Teacher Beliefs, and Classroom Interactions, American Educational Research Association (AERA) Annual Meeting, American Educational Research Association (AERA), Montreal, Canada.
  • Nathan, M.J. (1999). The Teaching and Learning of Early Algebra at the Middle School Level: A 3-year Review, American Educational Research Association (AERA) Annual Meeting, American Educational Research Association (AERA), Montreal, Canada.
  • Nathan, M.J., Knuth, E., & Elliott, R. (1998). Analytic and Social Scaffolding in the Mathematics Classroom: One Teacher's Changing Practices, American Educational Research Association (AERA) Annual Meeting, American Educational Research Association (AERA), San Diego, CA.
  • Nathan, M.J., Elliott, R., Knuth, E., & French, A. (1997). Self-reflection on Teacher Goals and Actions in the Mathematics Classroom, American Educational Research Association (AERA) Annual Meeting, American Educational Research Association (AERA), Chicago, IL.
  • Nathan, M.J., & Elliott, R. (1996). Evaluating Models of Practice: Reform-based Mathematics at the Middle School Level, Psychology of Mathematics Education (PME) Annual Meeting, Psychology of Mathematics, Clearwater, FL.
  • Nathan, M.J. (1996). Computer-based Tutoring in Support of Human Tutoring and Learner Agency, American Educational Research Association (AERA) Annual Meeting, American Educational Research Association (AERA), New York, NY.
  • Nathan, M.J., Koedinger, K., & Tabachneck, H.T. (1996). Difficulty Factors in Arithmetic and Algebra: The Disparity of Teachers' Beliefs and Students' Performances (roundtable discussion), American Educational Research Association (AERA) Annual Meeting, American Educational Research Association (AERA), New York, NY.
  • Nathan, M.J. (1996). The Embodiment of Design Principles for Situationally Dynamic Tools to Foster Mathematical Story Comprehension and Problem Solving (interactive poster), American Educational Research Association (AERA) Annual Meeting, American Educational Research Association (AERA), New York, NY.
  • Nathan, M.J. (1995). Comprehension processes during mathematical reasoning: What it means for classroom and computer-based learning environments, Cognitive Science and Technology Seminar Series, University of Northern Colorado, Greeley, CO.
  • Nathan, M.J. (1995). Comprehension processes during mathematical reasoning, Presentation to the Institute of Cognitive Science, University of Colorado, Institute of Cognitive Science.
  • Nathan, M.J. (1995). Discussion on "The Multimedia Journal Article" Format as a New Technology for Reporting Research and Evaluation Projects, American Educational Research Association (AERA) Annual Meeting, American Educational Research Association (AERA).
  • Nathan, M.J., Mertz, K., & Ryan, R. (1994). Learning Through Self-explanation of Mathematics Examples: Effects of Cognitive Load (poster), American Educational Research Association (AERA) Annual Meeting, American Educational Research Association (AERA).
  • Nathan, M.J. (1994). How Many Situation Models?, Winter Text Conference, Jackson Hole, WY.
  • Nathan, M.J. (1993). A Comparative Analysis of Learning Environment Design: The Case of Mathematical Word Problem Solving, Artificial Intelligence and Education Annual Meeting, Edinburgh, United Kingdom.
  • Nathan, M.J. (1993). "Inference-making During Word Problem Solving", European Association for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI), Aix-en-Provence, France.
  • Nathan, M.J. (1993). Toward a comprehension-based model of problem-solving competence, Presentation to the German Research Center for Artificial Intelligence (DFKI), German Research Center for Artificial Intelligence, Kaiserslautern, Germany.
  • Nathan, M.J. (1993). Assessing and Improving Comprehension of Mathematical Story Problems, Winter Text Conference, Jackson Hole, WY.
  • Nathan, M.J. (1992). Situation models as a vehicle for sense-making, Presentation to The Artifacts and Sense-Making Group, University of California-Berkeley, Graduate School of Education, Berkeley, CA.
  • Nathan, M.J., & Resnick, L.B. (1992). Less Can Be More, NATO Advanced Study Institute (ASI) on the Psychological and Educational Foundations of Technology-Based Learning Environments, NATO Advanced Study Institute (ASI) on the Psychological and Educational Foundations of Technology-Based Learning Environments, Crete, Greece.
  • Nathan, M.J. (1992). Can we assess the assessments?, Presentation to The New Standards Project Advisory Board Meeting on Language Arts, The New Standards Project Advisory Board, San Francisco, CA.
  • Nathan, M.J., Presenter Only, Kintsch, W., Presenter Only, Britton, B., Presenter Only, & Mannes, S., Presenter Only (1990). A comprehension-based approach to learning and instruction, Address to the American Education Research Association 1990 Annual Meeting, American Education Research Association (AERA), Boston, MA.
  • Nathan, M.J. (1989). A theory of problem comprehension, Presentation to The University of Bern, Department of Educational Psychology, University of Bern, Department of Educational Psychology, Bern, Switzerland.
  • Nathan, M.J. (1988). Animating Algebra Word Problems, Rocky Mountain Psychological Association, Rocky Mountain Psychological Association, Snowbird, UT.
  • Greenberg, H.J., & Nathan, M.J. (1986). Object Decomposition for Collision Avoidance, ORSA/TIMS Joint National Meeting, Miami, FL.
  • Nathan, M.J. (1985). Machine vision and machine knowledge, Presentation to the University of Colorado-Denver, Department of Mathematics (Professor H. Greenberg), University of Colorado-Denver, Department of Mathematics, Denver, CO.
  • Nathan, M.J. (1985). Robotic vision: Theory and engineering applications, Presentation to the Colorado School of Mines, Department of Engineering, Colorado School of Mines, Department of Engineering.
  • Halverson, E.R., & Nathan, M.J. Curriculum design: The backwards design process, Medical Education Day, UW-Madison School of Medicine, Madison, WI.

School Service

  • DIrector, Center on Education and Work
    Dates of Membership: 2011 - Pres.
    Accomplishments: CEW provides career development support (including Wisconsin Careers software and the annual Careers Conference), research on school to work transition, and policy recommendations for improving the relationship of education and workplace attainment.
  • Director.

  • Doctoral Research Program (DRP) Executive Committee
    Dates of Membership: 2007 - Pres.
  • Member. Period of Service: 2007 - Pres.

  • Faculty Senate
    Dates of Membership: 2007 - Pres.
  • Faculty Representative. Period of Service: 2007 - Pres.

Public Service

  • Review of Educational Research
    Dates of Membership: 2007 - 2009
  • Editorial Review Board Member. Period of Service: 2007 - 2009

  • Cognitive Science Conference
    Dates of Membership: Sep. 2006 - Sep. 2008
  • Committee Member. Period of Service: Sep. 2006 - Sep. 2008

Public Service

  • American Educational Research Association (AERA) 2013 (San Francisco), Section Chair for Learning and Instruction—Engineering Education and Computer Science Education (Division C, Section 1e.
    Dates of Membership: March 2012 - April 2013
    Accomplishments: Note this is the first year for this section.

  • National Academy of Engineering Committee on Integrated STEM Education
    Dates of Membership: 2011 - Pres.
    Accomplishments: Full literature review and recommendations for Integrated STEM Education in the USA.

  • Program Committee Chair, Computer Supported Collaborative Learning 2013
    Dates of Membership: Oct. 2011 - Aug. 2013
    Accomplishments: Institute the theme and policies for the 2013 meeting, produce the call for papers, set up conference committees.

  • American Educational Research Association (AERA) Annual Meeting Policies and Procedures Committee
    Dates of Membership: April 2008 - April 2011
    Accomplishments: I initiate and implement far-reaching reforms to the meeting to improve its quality.

Memberships

  • American Educational Research Association (AERA)
    Position Held: Division C Chair; Section C-3 (Mathematics Education) Chair; Chair, Annual Meeting Policies and Procedures Committee, Scope of Organization: International, Membership Period: March 2008 - April 2011
  • Cognitive Science Society (CogSci)
    Position Held: Program Committee Member, Scope of Organization: International, Member Since: January 2007
  • International Society of the Learning Sciences (ISLS)
    Position Held: Treasurer/Secretary (Founding officer), Scope of Organization: International, Membership Period: October 2002 - November 2005
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