University of Wisconsin–Madison

School Psychology Students

Claire Barrett

Claire Barrett is completing a joint PhD in Educational Psychology and Civil Society & Community Research. She utilizes community-based participatory evaluation and research methods in order to study child and family well-being, particularly through the transformation of school and community food systems. Her teaching and research interests are in the areas of prevention science and health promotion, school and community food systems, civic development across the lifespan, and family, school and community partnerships. In working with school and community-based interventions aimed at supporting the health and learning of children and their families, Claire also studies the development of college students’ civic dispositions through participation in these engaged learning opportunities.

Stephanie Borjas

Stephanie Borjas is a third-year doctoral student in the Educational Psychology department. She first became interested in education research while pursuing her bachelor’s degree at the University of Notre Dame. There she majored in Psychology and minored in Education, Schooling, and Society and European Studies. While at the University of Notre Dame, Stephanie was a research assistant in the Cognitive, Learning, and Development (CLAD) Lab, which focuses on how children think, learn, and solve problems in the domain of mathematics. Stephanie is now a doctoral student in the Educational Psychology Department, with a concentration in School Psychology. She has been involved with several WCER projects, including a project that aims to validate curriculum-based measures (CBMs) for English Language Learners, a meta-analysis that investigates academic interventions that effectively reduce the achievement gap, and working with the World Class Instructional Design and Assessment (WIDA) consortium. In addition, Stephanie has worked on different research projects at the Waisman Center that investigate how to best support students with Autism Spectrum Disorder in secondary education and in their transition after secondary education. Stephanie recently received her Masters Degree in Educational Psychology and is currently exploring research interests in evidence-based academic interventions and working with underrepresented and diverse populations.

Stephanie D’Costa

Stephanie D’Costa is a graduate student in the School Psychology program area. Her dissertation research examined the effectiveness of a modified guided reading intervention in promoting the academic language of English Language Learners (ELLs). Stephanie is currently working with WIDA developing their Assessment framework for ELLs. She is additionally working at mental health clinic providing treatment to children and families who have experienced sexual abuse.

Education:

  • Bachelor of Arts, Human Development minor in Cross Cultural Language and Academic Development, California State University, Long Beach 2011
  • Masters of Science, Educational Psychology, University of Wisconsin-Madison 2014

Research:

Acculturation Stress, Trauma-Informed Therapy, Cultural Adaptations to Evidence Based Interventions(EBIs), English Language Learners (ELLs), Immigrant populations, Intervention efficacy, Out-of-School Interventions, Educational Disparities, Literacy

Presentations:

  • Leverett, P., D´costa, S., & Seid, K. (2014, April). Addressing racial disparities in school discipline: Practical implications of cultural adaptation models on behavior interventions. Symposium conducted at the Minority Student Achievement Network Institute, Madison, WI
  • Leverett, P., D´costa, S., & Nickens, L. (2014, February). Meta-analyses of interventions targeting ethnic racial disparities across three dimensions: Preliminary results. Symposium conducted at the 2014 Diversity Summit, Madison, WI
  • D´costa, S., Kuhn, J., & Borjas, S. (2014, February). Meta-Analysis on effective interventions with English Learners. In P.M. Leverett (Chair), Meta-analyses of interventions targeting ethnic-racial disparities across three dimensions. Symposium conducted at the National Association for School Psychologists Convention, Washington D.C.
  • Leverett, P., D´costa, S., Vivian, E., & Borjas, S. (2014, February). Meta-analysis of academic interventions for ethnic and racially diverse populations. In P.M. Leverett (Chair), Meta-analyses of interventions targeting ethnic-racial disparities across three dimensions. Symposium conducted at the National Association for School Psychologists Convention, Washington D.C.
  • Kuhn, J., D’costa, S., Malachowski, M., Salgado, R., Herrera, N., Rodriguez, M., Wuchte, L., Thormann, A., Pinduisaca, D., & Quintana, S. (2014, February). “Children’s developmental understanding of disability: Guatemalan children in inclusion school.” Poster Presentation at the National Association for School Psychologists Convention, Washington D.C.
  • D’costa, S., Kuhn, J., Spalter, A. & Schultz, J. (2013, October). “Teaching and reaching every area: Community-based programming for ELLs.” Poster Presentation at the National WIDA Conference, Milwaukee.
  • Kuhn, J., Mission, P., D’costa, S., Borjas, S. & Vivyan,E. (2013, August). “Evaluating Language Intervention Efficacy at Specific English Language Proficiency Levels.” Poster Presentation at American Psychological Association, Honolulu
  • Manke, B. & D’costa, S. (2012, April). “A randomized control trial of a literacy intervention program”. Poster Presentation at Western Psychological Association, San Fransico.
  • Mission, P., Bice-Urbach, B., Kuhn, J., D’costa, S., Olarte-DaSilva, S., Swoboda, C., Albers, C., Kratochwill,  T. & Kaplan, D. (2012). “Oral reading fluency measures for bilingual students: Early findings in a dual immersion program.” Poster Presentation at National Association of School Psychologists

Melanie Fuhrmann

Melanie Fuhrmann is a graduate student in School Psychology.  She earned her B.A. in Psychology and Spanish Studies from the University of Minnesota – Twin Cities where she was involved in research at the Minnesota Center for Twin and Family Research and completed original research on major depressive disorder and substance use disorders in adolescents.  After graduating, Melanie worked in a clinical neuroscience research lab at the University of Minnesota – Twin Cities and also worked as a Bilingual Associate Educator for Minneapolis Public Schools.  Melanie’s current interests lie in education disparities and school psychology service provision for diverse students.  Her research interests include language and literacy development, particularly language and literacy development in students classified as English Language Learners, as well as multi-tiered system of supports.

Education:

  • PhD. Educational Psychology(Specialization: School Psychology),University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI, Minor: Research Methods and Statistics, Expected May 2016
  • MS. Educational Psychology(Specialization: School Psychology), University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI, May 2012
  • MA. Psychology; Spanish Studies, University of Minnesota, Twin Cities, MN, Summa Cum Laude, with Distinction, May 2007

Research:

Doctoral Dissertation, University of Wisconsin-Madison, expected to be defended 2015-2016 academic year

Craig A. Albers, Ph.D., Research Advisor

  • Dissertation Topic: “Effectiveness of Leamos para Avanzar: Un programa para niños(Let’s Read to Advance: A Reading Program for Children) for Spanish-Dominant English Language Learners”

Clinical Translational Core Student Hourly, Waisman Center, University of Wisconsin-Madison, February 2012-August 2013; November 2013-June 2014

Clarissa Schienebeck, Ph.D., supervisor

  • Maintained Fragile X Research Registry, created and maintained databases for research studies, provided consultation for research studies, presented and explained preliminary results of research studies, and trained research lab members how to administer and score the Wechsler Abbreviated Scale of Intelligence(WASI)

Master’s Thesis, University of Wisconsin-Madison, defended September 2011

Craig A. Albers, Ph.D., Research Advisor

  • “Building Validity Evidence for Performance on the Alternate ACCESS for ELLs

Project Assistant, Alternate ACCESS for ELLs™, World-Class Instructional Design and Assessment (WIDA) Consortium, Wisconsin Center for Education Research (WCER), University of Wisconsin-Madison, September 2009-May 2011

Craig A. Albers, Ph.D., Supervisor

  • Co-developed the pilot-test and field-test versions of the first alternate English language proficiency assessment for students in grades prekindergarten (PK)-12 who are classified as English Language Learners (ELLs) and have significant disabilities (i.e., Alternate ACCESS for ELLs™), contributed to the Alternate ACCESS for ELLs™Test Administration Manual, and gathered validity evidence for performance on the Alternate ACCESS for ELLs™

Junior Scientist, University of Minnesota-Twin Cities, September 2007-June 2009

Christopher J. Patrick, Ph.D., Supervisor

  • Served as Principal Recruiter for a large-scale twin project, developed formal protocol for recruitment, developed procedures for coding and entering diagnostic interview and psychometric test data, created and maintained databases, and trained and supervised research assistants involved with recruitment and data coding

Summa Cum Laude Honors Thesis, University of Minnesota-Twin Cities, completed May 2007

William G. Iacono, Ph.D., Research Advisor

  • “Peer and Romantic Relationship Correlates of Major Depressive Disorder and Substance Use Disorders in Adolescents”

Publications

Journal Publications

  • Albers, C. A., Floyd, R. G., Fuhrmann, M. J., & Martinez, R. S. (2011). Publication criteria and areas of improvement within school psychology journals as reported by editors, journal board members, and manuscript authors. Journal of School Psychology 49(6), 669-689.

Newsletter Publications

  • Bice-Urbach, B., Mission, P., Fuhrmann, M., & Martin, M. (2012). Advancing school psychology through connected and virtual university collaboration. The School Psychologist 67(1), 56-62.
  • Albers, C. A., Wohlferd, A., & Fuhrmann, M. (2010). Assessing the ELP growth of ELs with significant disabilities.AccELLerate 3(1), 7-9.

Presentations

Symposia

  • Quintana, S., Felt, J., Fuhrmann, M., Olarte-DaSilva, S., Sorensen, S., Spalter, A., & Vollmer, L. (2012, February). APA Task Force on Educational Disparities: Implications for school psychology. Symposium conducted at the meeting of the National Association of School Psychologists, Philadelphia, PA.

Mini-Skills Workshops

  • Fuhrmann, M., Spalter, A., & Mission, P. (2012, February). Evaluating programs in diverse school settings: Approaches and case examples. Mini skills session presented at the meeting of the National Association of School Psychologists, Philadelphia, PA.
  • McGivern, J., Shalev, R., Fuhrmann, M., & Sorensen, S. (2012, February). Evidence-based anxiety interventions: Individualizing treatment while maintaining treatment integrity. Mini skills session presented at the meeting of the National Association of School Psychologists, Philadelphia, PA.

Poster Presentations

  • Spalter, A., Mission, P., & Fuhrmann, M.(2011, August). Out-of-school time programs & family involvement: Theoretical framework and applications. Poster session presented at the meeting of the Student Affiliates of School Psychology at the meeting of the American Psychological Association, Washington, DC.
  • Albers, C. A., & Fuhrmann, M. J.(2011, February). Validity of alternate language proficiency assessment of ELLs with disabilities. Poster session presented at the meeting of the National Association of School Psychologists, San Francisco, CA.
  • Scott, S. A., Fuhrmann, M. J., Vaidyanathan, U., Kramer, M. D., & Patrick, C. J. (2009). Trait variations in fear and fearlessness: Relations with DSM-IV personality disorder symptoms. Poster session presented at the meeting of the Society for the Scientific Study of Psychopathy, New Orleans, LA.

Teaching

  • Teaching Assistant, Educational Psychology 301: Human Abilities and Learning, University of Wisconsin-Madison,Summer 2013
  • Teaching Assistant, Educational Psychology 760: Statistical Methods Applied to Education I, University of Wisconsin-Madison,Summer 2011, Fall 2011, Fall 2012
  • Teaching Assistant, Educational Psychology 761: Statistical Methods Applied to Education II, University of Wisconsin-Madison,Spring 2012, Spring 2013
  • Teaching Assistant, Educational Psychology 711: Designing and Managing the Learning Environment, University of Wisconsin-Madison,Summer 2012
  • World Language Instructor-Spanish, Wisconsin Youth Company,Madison, WI, January 2012-May 2012
  • Bilingual Associate Educator-Spanish, Richard R. Green Central Park School, Minneapolis Public Schools,Minneapolis, MN, August 2007-June 2009
  • Teaching Assistant, School of Public Health On-line Course on Alcohol and Other Drug Abuse, University of Minnesota-Twin Cities,Fall 2006-Spring 2007

Julie Gocey

Julie Gocey is a practicing Pediatrician with UW Health in Madison, WI.  She has a special interest in the interaction between education and health.  She earned a BS in Psychology from Indiana State University in Terre Haute, IN and her medical degree from Southern Illinois University, in Springfield, IL.  Dr. Gocey completed her residency in Pediatrics at UW Hospital and Clinics in Madison, WI.  She plans to incorporate her training in School Psychology into her Pediatric practice in order to improve collaboration among healthcare providers, families and school professionals.

Julie Horner

Julie Ann Horner is a Ph.D. student in the School Psychology program area of Educational Psychology at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. She is currently in her seventh year as a graduate student. During the course of her studies at UW-Madison she has completed advanced practica that included working with children with disabilities and their families in community-and primary care-settings. She has also completed advanced research and statistical courses in addition to her normal course of studies.

She received her BA in Psychology from University of California Irvine in Irvine, CA, where she was involved in research that investigated the physical health of children and the role of normative stressors. During her undergraduate work she focused on neuropsychology and brain development within individuals with disabilities as well as educational studies and developmental psychology. Her current research interests include the role of applied behavior analysis in documenting and promoting prosocial behaviors among children and adolescents with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Her current research work includes ways of characterizing the social skills of children with autism spectrum disorders for intervention purposes. She is also interested in test construction for neuropsychological assessments and the use of neuropsychological assessments to inform intervention and school practice. Currently, she has private employment that focuses on implementing applied behavior analysis principles with children with autism spectrum disorders with the use of play therapy.

Katharine Roling (Hughes)

Katharine Roling (Hughes) is a third-year School Psychology student from Cedar Rapids, IA. As an undergraduate, she investigated memory in cognitive and social psychology research labs and was active in Psi Chi.  In her graduate career at UW-Madison, she has served on SPSA’s Practicum Committee and currently works with the Master of Science for Professional Educators (MSPE) program as a graduate assistant. Katie is exploring research interests in vocabulary development in English language learners under advisor Maribeth Gettinger. She is particularly interested in the application of findings from cognitive psychology, such as the effect of retrieval practice, to this area.

Education:

  • MS., Educational Psychology, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Fall 2014
  • BS., Psychology, Iowa State University, Spring 2012

Research:

Katie served as a project assistant with the “Validating Universal Screening and Progress Monitoring Instruments for Use with ELLs in Response to Intervention Models” project at the Wisconsin Center for Education Research.

Publications:

  • Chan, J. C. K., Wilford, M. M., & Hughes, K. L.(2012). Retrieval can increase or reduce suggestibility depending on how memory is tested: The importance of source complexity. Journal of Memory and Language67(1), 78-85.

Presentations:

  • Roling, K.L., & Borjas, S. K. (2015, February). After-school programming: Enhancing literacy in English language learners. Poster presented at the National Association of School Psychologists conference, Orlando, FL.
  • Hughes, K.L.(2012, May). Does testing enhance memory for faces? Applications of retrieval practice in facial recognition. Poster presented at Iowa State University Honors Program Poster Presentation, Ames, IA.

Jocelyn Kuhn

Jocelyn Lara Kuhn is a graduate student in the School Psychology program, working under Craig Albers. Before graduate school, she attended the University of Michigan – Ann Arbor, where her passion for applied work and research related to supporting children with diverse developmental, linguistic, and cultural backgrounds blossomed. During her undergraduate years at Michigan, Jocelyn conducted an original research study as part of her honors thesis in Psychology, taught Spanish world-language classes in an elementary school, mentored and tutored Latino students at an after-school club, and worked at an inclusive summer camp supporting a child with a significant developmental disability. In 2011, Jocelyn graduated with distinction, earning a B.A. in Honors Psychology and Spanish. As a graduate student at UW-Madison, Jocelyn worked for three years on a U.S. Department of Education, Institute of Education Sciences (IES) grant that examined the use of response-to-intervention procedures with English language learners. Jocelyn is currently conducting applied research for her dissertation study, which examines the effectiveness of an evidence-based literacy intervention with students who have diverse cultural backgrounds and a range of English language proficiency levels. Currently a second-year trainee in Wisconsin’s Maternal and Child Health (MCH) Leadership Education in Neurodevelopmental and Related Disabilities (LEND) program, Jocelyn works with Waisman Center faculty pursuing research related to an education and support program for transition-aged adolescents with Autism Spectrum Disorder and their families, and she is completing a practicum in the Waisman Center’s Autism and Developmental Disabilities Clinic. Jocelyn is currently in her first year of professional practice as a School Psychologist in the Madison Metropolitan School District.

Education:

  • 2014 – M.S., Educational Psychology, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI
  • 2011 – B.A., Honors Psychology and Spanish, with Distinction, University of Michigan-Ann Arbor, Ann Arbor, MI

Research:

Jocelyn’s research interests involve school-and community-based prevention and intervention practices for diverse learners, particularly students with developmental disabilities and English language learners.

Jocelyn is currently involved in research projects on the following topics:

  • Evaluating the effectiveness of an evidence-based literacy intervention with culturally and linguistically diverse elementary students in a response-to-intervention framework
  • Validating the use of universal screening assessments with English language learners in a response-to-intervention framework
  • Developing a cultural adaptation of “Transitioning Together,” a support and education program for adolescents with Autism Spectrum Disorder and their parents
  • Examining academic interventions and educational disparities among English language learners with meta-analytic techniques
  • Understanding the connection between environmental supports and the psychological well-being of parents of adolescents with Autism Spectrum Disorder
  • Analyzing children’s perceptions, attitudes, and conceptual understandings of “disability” at an inclusion school in Guatemala

Presentations:

  • Kuhn, J.L.,Mission, P.M., & Albers, C.A. (Accepted). Advancing universal literacy screening procedures for Spanish-speaking English language learners. Paper session accepted to the 2015 American Psychological Association Annual Convention, Toronto, Canada.
  • Kuhn, J.L., Borjas, S., Sorenson, D., & D’Costa, S. (Accepted). Redressing English learner educational disparities with academic interventions: A meta-analysis. Paper session accepted to the 2015 American Psychological Association Annual Convention, Toronto, Canada.
  • Kuhn, J.L., & Vivyan, E. (Accepted). Transforming systems of practice: Meeting the needs of culturally and linguistically diverse students. Presentation accepted to the 2015 Interamerican Congress of Psychology, Lima, Peru.
  • Kuhn, J.L., Quintana, S., Herrera, N., Salgado, R., & Vivyan, E. (Accepted). Percepciones de niños guatemaltecos sobre las discapacidades y la escuela inclusiva. Presentation accepted to the 2015 Interamerican Congress of Psychology, Lima, Peru.
  • Salgado, R., & Kuhn, J.L.(Accepted). Cultural and linguistic adaptation of an education and support program for families with adolescents with ASD. Presentation accepted at the Interamerican Congress of Psychology, Lima, Peru.
  • Quintana, S., Herrera, N., Kuhn, J.L., Salgado, R., & Vivyan, E. (Accepted). Desarrollo de comprensión sobre la discapacidad en niños. Presentation accepted to the 2015 Interamerican Congress of Psychology, Lima, Peru.
  • Kuhn, J.L.,Ehlers, K., & Smith, L. (2014). Strong, hopeful, strong, and weak ecological connections and well-being of parents of adolescents with Autism Spectrum Disorder. Poster presentation at the International Meeting for Autism Research, May, 2014, Atlanta, GA.
  • Leverett, P., Kuhn, J.L.,D’Costa, S., Borjas, S., Vivyan, E., Nichols, L., & Sorenson, D. (2014). Meta-analyses of interventions targeting ethnic-racial disparities in education across three dimensions. Symposium session at the National Association of School Psychologists Annual Convention, February, 2014, Washington, D.C.
  • Kuhn, J.L.,D’Costa, S., Malachowski, M., Salgado, R. (2014). Children’s developmental understanding of disability: Guatemalan children in Inclusion school. Poster presentation at the National Association of School Psychologists Annual Convention, February, 2014, Washington, D.C.
  • D’Costa, S., Kuhn, J.L.,Schultz, J., & Spalter, A. (2013). Teaching and reaching every area: Community-based programming for ELLs. Symposium session at the World-Class Instructional Design and Assessment (WIDA) National Conference, Milwaukee, WI.
  • Kuhn, J.L.,Mission, P.L., D’Costa, S., Borjas, S., & Vivyan, E. (2013). Evaluating language intervention efficacy at specific English language proficiency levels. Poster presentation at the American Psychological Association Annual Convention, Honolulu, HI.
  • Albers, C., Kratochwill, T.R., Kaplan, D., Bice-Urbach, B.J., Mission, P.L., Bice, Olarte-DaSilva, S., Kuhn, J.L.,& Wood, C. (2013). Oral reading fluency measures for bilingual Spanish-speaking students: Early findings in Spanish curriculum-based measures. Poster presentation at the National Association of School Psychologists Annual Convention, Seattle, WA.
  • Albers, C., Kratochwill, T.R., Kaplan, D., Mission, P.L., Bice-Urbach, B.J., Kuhn, J.L., D’Costa, S., Olarte-DaSilva, S., & Swoboda, C. (2012). Oral reading fluency measures for bilingual Spanish-speaking students: Early findings in a dual language immersion program. Poster presentation at the National Association of School Psychologists Annual Convention, Philadelphia, PA.
  • Albers, C., Kratochwill, T.R., Kaplan, D., Mission, P.L., Bice-Urbach, B.J., Kuhn, J.L.,D’Costa, S., & Olarte-DaSilva, S. (2011). Universal screening and progress monitoring instruments for use with ELLs in response-to-intervention models. Poster presentation at the Wisconsin Center for Education Research Poster Fair, Madison, WI.
  • Kuhn, J.L.(2011). World language learning and cultural beliefs among elementary students. Deep Blue Archive at the University of Michigan: Honors Theses (Bachelors).
  • Kuhn, J.L.& Gelman, S.A. (2008). A study of cross-cultural language acquisition: Noun use in Southern Peruvian Quechua. Poster presentation at the University of Michigan Undergraduate Research Opportunities Program Spring Symposium and Research Forum, Ann Arbor, MI.

Jacob Kopf

Jacob Kopf is a graduate student in the School Psychology area. He grew up in an Air Force family and has lived in 6 states and 4 countries total. Jacob graduating from Brown University double majoring in History (19th Century American) and Psychology. Before beginning graduate school he spent three years teacher in the Washington D.C metro area.

Education:

  • Bachelor of Arts Degree in Psychology and History, Brown University, 2011

Research:

Jacob’s current research interests include the effects of student mobilty/frequency of school changes on student outcomes, early prevention and intervention, and how the RTI model can be most effectively applied to secondary schools.

Andrea Lupas

Andrea Lupas is a graduate student in the School Psychology program area.

Education:

  • She received her bachelor’s degree in Psychology and Rhetoric at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

Research:

Her previous research focused on gender gaps and subsequent perception of intelligence in young children. Currently, her research interests include behavior modifications and interventions in young children with autism and other neurodevelopmental disorders.

Maria Malachowski

Maria Malachowski is a graduate student in the School Psychology area. She received her BA in Psychology from St. John’s University in New York City.  She is interested in promoting healthy emotional and academic functioning for students of diverse backgrounds through the effective integration of culture and family life. She is also interested in the impacts of language on parenting/parental involvement and overall academic achievement. Due to her strong behavioral background, she is currently involved on a grant which is utilizing the principles of applied behavioral analysis to improve school problem solving teams.

Lana Mahgoub

Lana Mahgoub is a graduate student in the School Psychology area. She is from Arlington, VA. She received her B.A. in Psychology with a concentration in Neuroscience from Grinnell College where she worked in a behavioral lab researching the success of minority students in STEM classes and measures used to assess success. She has also conducted research regarding children’s language development and has an interest in working with minority populations and bilingual speakers.

Education:

  • BA. in Psychology with a concentration in Neuroscience, Grinnell College, Grinnell, Iowa, 2014

Research:

Currently, Lana’s research interests involve children’s language cognition and minority student achievement.  She is interested in furthering research on bilingualism and resolving multicultural issues in education, particularly in regard to ELLs in schools.

Publications:

  • Mahgoub, L. (2013).Foreign language discrimination by 3-6 year old monolingual children. PREP Journal. 

Ryann Morrison

Ryann Morrison is a first year graduate student in the School Psychology program area. She earned her BS in Psychology with a Spanish minor from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. While an undergrad, she was involved in research focused on parent-child relationships and parent-teacher conferences. Her past experiences include working at an intensive therapeutic camp for children with emotional and behavior difficulties as well as being an advocate for adolescent girls who had been in the juvenile detention center. She is currently involved with project LIST where she has the opportunity to observe and collect data during problem-solving team meetings in elementary schools. Her research interests include behavior management, mental illness, and peer relationships. She is interested in examining how these topics affect adolescents in school and ways to improve functioning.

Linda Nickens

Linda Nickens is a graduate student in the School Psychology program area.  She received her BA in Psychology at Carleton College in Northfield, MN, and was involved in various research cognitive and psychopharmacological research projects.  Linda also received her MS in Rehabilitation Counseling and Psychology (with an emphasis on developmental disabilities) at University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.  She is also a certified rehabilitation counselor.  Linda’s current research interests include: interventions used for students with challenging behaviors and autism, as well as the relationship between family involvement, support, and perceptions to academic achievement.

Stephanie Olarte

Stephanie Olarte is a dissertator in the school psychology program. She is currently working on her dissertation in her hometown near Fort Lauderdale, FL. Her research interests center around multicultural education and include ethnic identity, culturally responsive education, urban schooling, and personnel development.

Education:

  • Master of Science in School Psychology, UW-Madison: December 2012
  • Bachelor of Arts with Honors in Psychology: Florida International University: December 2009

Research:

  • Dissertation:An examination of ethnic identity and the use of culturally responsive practices among Latino teachers in diverse classrooms. June 2013 to present
  • Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction:Cultural Competence in Student Services. July 2012 to April 2013
  • Project Assstant:Validating Universal Screening and Progress Monitoring Instruments for use with ELL students in Response to Intervention Models. September 2011 to July 2013
  • Educational Disparities Focus Group: September 2011 to June 2014

Katie Ostrander

Katie Ostrander is a graduate student in the School Psychology program area.  She received her bachelor’s degree in Psychology with a minor in Sociology from Indiana Wesleyan University in Marion, Indiana. At Indiana Wesleyan, she was involved in Social Psychology research. She is interested in studying the ways poverty affects the academic success of children.

Alexandra Puk

Alexandra Puk is a graduate student in the School Psychology program. She received her BS in Psychology at UW-Madison in 2011. Alex’s research interests include early intervention for developmental disabilities – specifically Autism Spectrum Disorder. Additionally, she is interested in parent involvement and training for early intervention, as well as the transition into elementary school for students with behavioral challenges.

Education:

  • BS., Psychology, UW Madison 2011

Vanessa Reynolds

Vanessa Schwartz is a graduate student in the School Psychology program area. She received a bachelors degree in Psychology from the University of Wisconsin- La Crosse. Vanessa is currently a third year in the program and her advisor is Jenny Asmus. Her research interests include social competence, social participation, and friendship in children and adolescents on the Autism Spectrum. She is also interested in working with at-risk youth and implements social-emotional as well as educational groups at the Dane County Juvenile Detention Center.

Dana Sorensen

Dana Sorensen is a graduate student in the School Psychology area of the Educational Psychology department.  She received a BA in Psychology from University of Wisconsin—Madison.  Dana works as a project assistant for Project LIST, investigating how problem-solving teams within the school setting function. Her research broadly focuses on educational disparities.

Education:

  • MA.,Psychology, University of Wisconsin – Madison, Madison, WI

Research:

Dana is interested in academic achievement, particularly narrowing the achievement gap for English Language Learners (ELLs) and investigating math interventions focusing on academic achievement for all students.  She is currently working on a meta-analysis with the Educational Disparities Study Group, examining the effect sizes in mathematics for interventions designed to increase achievement of ethnic and racial minority students.

Presentations:

  • Hagermoser, E., Willes, M., Sorensen, D., Dohrn, E., Kratochwill, T., & Asmus, J.(2014). Interventions addressing common barriers to implementing evidence-based interventions with problem solving teams.  Annual Convention, Wisconsin Association for Behavior Analysis, Madison, WI.
  • Leverett, P., Borjas, S., D’Costa, S., Kuhn, J., Vivyan, E., Sorensen, D., … Quintana, S.  (2014). Meta-analyses of interventions targeting ethnic-racial disparities across three dimensions. Annual Convention, National School Psychologist Association, Washington, D.C.

Erika Vivyan

Erika Vivyan is a graduate student in the School Psychology program area.  She received her bachelor’s degree from Michigan State University in East Lansing, Michigan, where she was a student in the Residential College in the Arts & Humanities.  Erika graduated with a Psychology major and Educational Studies minor.  Erika is currently a Graduate Student Researcher working with the Talking About Leaving – Revisited project through the Wisconsin Center for Educational Research.  Erika’s dissertation research is focused on factors of cultural incongruence among undergraduate women and students of color in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) fields.  She is interested in working with culturally and linguistically diverse students at the individual, group, and systems levels in order to promote more equitable academic and educational outcomes.

Education:

  • MA., Residential College of Arts and Humanities, Michigan State University, 2012
  • BS., Educational Psychology, University of Wisconsin – Madison, 2014

Presentations:

  • Ferrare, J., Benbow, R., & Vivyan, E. (2014, April 7). Constructing classroom culture: A framework for analysis in the context of gateway chemistry courses. Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the American Educational Research Association, Philadelphia, PA.
  • Leverett, P., D’costa, S., Vivyan, E., Kuhn, J., Nickens, L, Borjas, S., & Olarte-DaSilva, S. (2014, February 21). Meta-analyses of interventions targeting ethnic-racial disparities across three dimensions.  Symposium presented at the National Association of School Psychologists Annual Convention, Washington, D.C.
  • Vivyan, E. (2013, April 19). Talking about leaving – revisited: Exploring current patterns of undergraduate persistence in the sciences. Poster presented at Doctoral Research Program Conference, Madison, WI.
  • Vivyan, E. (2012, November 28). Talking about leaving – revisited. Poster presented at Wisconsin Center for Educational Research Poster Fair, Madison, WI.
  • Vivyan, E. and Carlson, J. (2011).  Protective factors and behavioral concerns in Head Start children. Red Cedar Undergraduate Review.
  • Vivyan, E., Carlson, J., Elliott, C., & Caver, T. (2011, August 5). Exploring behavioral risk and protective factors in at-risk preschoolers. Poster presented at American Psychological Association Conventions, Washington, DC.
  • Vivyan, E. and Soni, A. (2011, April 26). Leadership: Dialogues on diversity. Workshop presented at Minority Student Achievement Network Conference, Chapel Hill, NC.
  • Vivyan, E., Carlson, J., Elliott, C., & Caver, T. (2011, April 8). Exploring behavioral risk and protective factors in at-risk preschoolers. Poster presented at Michigan State University Undergraduate Research and Arts Forum, East Lansing, MI.
  • Vivyan, E. (2011, February 12). Communication for leaders: An introduction to dialogue. Workshop presented at Spartan Leadership Conference, East Lansing, MI.

Megan Willes

Megan Willes is a third-year School Psychology student from Northridge, CA. She graduated from the University of Utah in 2011 with degrees in both Psychology and Human Development and Family Studies. She spent a year working in an early intervention center for young children with Autism in Phoenix, AZ, where her interest in working with children with challenging behavior developed. She works on Project LIST with Drs. Kratochwill & Asmus analyzing barriers to problem-solving team functioning and implementation of evidence-based interventions in schools. Megan works with Dr. Maribeth Gettinger, and is interesting in examining the implementation of interventions for children (with and without disabilities) with challenging behavior in schools, teacher-implemented interventions, and intervention integrity. In her free time, she enjoys cooking, reading, traveling, and spending time with her husband, Alex, and her puppy, Olive.

Education:

  • MS., Educational Psychology, University of Wisconsin-Madison, December 2014
  • BA., Psychology, University of Utah, May 2011
  • BS., Human Development and Family Studies, University of Utah, May 2011

Presentations:

  • Bice-Urbach, B., Hagermoser, E., Willes, M., Schwartz, V., & Dohrn, E. (2013). A function based approach to examining school teams., Annual Convention, Wisconin Association for Behavior Analysis, Madison, WI.
  • Willes, M., & Schwartz, V. (2013). School-basesd PSTs: Improving the effectiveness of a collaborative team approach. Annual Convention, Midwest Instructional Leadership Council, St. Paul, MN.
  • Bice-Urbach, B., Hagermoser, E., & Willes, M. (2014). School-based problem solving teams: Finding the right approach for success. Annual Convention, National Association of School Psychologists, Washington D.C.
  • Hagermoser, E., Willes, M., Sorensen, D., & Dohrn, E. (2014). Interventions addressing common   barriers to implementing evidence-based interventions with problem solving teams., Annual        Convention, Wisconsin Association for Behavior Analysis, Madison, WI.