University of Wisconsin–Madison

Craig Albers

Program Director, Associate Professor

craig.albers@wisc.edu

(608) 262-4586

333 Educational Sciences
1025 West Johnson St
Madison, WI 53706-1706

Websites:

PERSONAL BIOGRAPHY

Craig received his doctorate at Arizona State University in 2002 and is an Associate Professor of Educational Psychology in the APA-accredited School Psychology Program at the University of Wisconsin – Madison. He is the Chairperson of the interdisciplinary Prevention & Intervention Sciences program at the UW. Craig teaches courses in Introduction to School Psychology; Social, Emotional, and Behavioral Assessment; Advanced Assessment and Intervention; Research Design and Methods; and Prevention and Intervention Sciences. He recently completed a US Department of Education training grant concerning systemic school reform and response-to-intervention techniques to improve the academic outcomes for all students. He also recently completed a $1.3 million Enhanced Assessment Grant from the US Department of Education to develop the Alternate ACCESS for ELLs, for which he is the sole author. The Alternate ACCESS for ELLs is an English language proficiency (ELP) measure designed for use with ELLs with significant disabilities and administered in 34 states. He is currently the Principal Investigator on a $1.6 million 4-year IES grant that is examining the use of response-to-intervention procedures with ELL students.

RESEARCH INTERESTS

One of my current research lines examines the critical components of universal screening and progress monitoring as part of prevention and early intervention models. Consequently, I have been examining the psychometric properties and utility of universal screening instruments, and how these procedures should be implemented in school settings. A second line of research is focused on increasing the recognition of ELL-related issues among educators and other human service providers and to further the knowledge base regarding how to improve long-term outcomes among this population. This consists examining the connection between language acquisition, literacy, social emotional functioning, and health outcomes; examining academic and emotional functioning instruments and procedures that can be used as universal screening measures to identify ELLs in need of additional supports at an early stage of difficulty development; and examining potential academic and emotional interventions for ELLs. A final line of research is the development of the Alternate ACCESS, which is an alternate language proficiency measure for ELL students with significant disabilities.

TEACHING INTERESTS

Prevention, intervention, and linguistically-diverse students.

GRANTS AND SPONSORSHIPS

  • 6/30/2016 – Amount: $1,600,000.00, “Improving Educational Outcomes For English Language Learners: Validating Screening And Progress Monitoring Instruments For Use In Response-To-Intervention Models,” Awarded By: U.S. Department of Education, Institute of Education Sciences, Sponsor Type: Federal, Craig A. Albers, Principal; Thomas R. Kratochwill, Co-Principal; David Kaplan, Co-Principal; FUNDED.
    Abstract: The proposed 4-year measurement project (Goal #5) under the Education Research Grants English Language Learner program is designed to (a) determine whether universal screening and progress monitoring procedures that are essential for the use of Response-to-Intervention (RTI) models are valid for use with English Language Learner (ELL) students, and to (b) use the collected data to model estimated language and literacy growth that will assist in establishing ELL guidelines for the appropriate use of universal screening and progress monitoring procedures within RTI models. To accomplish this goal, we propose to: 1. Establish the reliability, validity, and predictive accuracy of existing universal screening literacy instruments—including general curriculum-based measurement procedures (e.g., word identification, oral reading fluency, maze tasks), the Dynamic Indicators of Basic Early Literacy Skills (DIBELS), and the Indicadores Dinámicos del Éxito en la Lectura (IDEL; for Spanish-speaking ELL students)—for use with ELLs; 2. Establish the reliability, validity, utility, and cost-effectiveness of existing progress monitoring procedures for use with ELLs through the use of traditional psychometric procedures and newer, more sophisticated growth mixture modeling procedures; and 3. Establish, through multivariate growth modeling procedures, the connection between English language acquisition and literacy skills to define guidelines for the use of universal screening and progress monitoring procedures with ELLs. Multiple districts from each of the 20-state World-class Instructional Design and Assessment (WIDA) Consortium will provide a sample of approximately 4,200 students distributed across six English language proficiency levels and a control group of non-ELL students. The proposed project will use a 4-year longitudinal, multisite design for two cohorts of students. Analyses will examine the psychometric properties, including predictive validity indices, of the universal screening and progress monitoring measures. Multivariate growth modeling procedures will be used to examine English language proficiency and literacy growth. Multivariate growth modeling allows for the study of change over time in English language proficiency and literacy at the same time and can relate the parameters of both processes to time-varying and time-invariant background characteristics. The core component and innovative feature of this proposal is the validation of universal screening and progress monitoring procedures that will facilitate the longitudinal examination of the typical development of language acquisition and its interrelationship with reading skills among ELLs in this project – something that is essential for appropriately implementing RTI procedures with ELL students. Prior universal screening and progress monitoring research has failed to examine the impact of varying degrees of English language proficiency on the attainment of basic academic skills. The opportunity to explore these relationships is unique, as this project will be conducted with support from the University of Wisconsin’s WIDA Consortium, which will ensure a large and representative sample of ELL students with varying levels of English language proficiency. Our proposed analyses relaxes the one-size-fits-all perspective of conventional growth curve modeling and will provide for a more nuanced approach to progress monitoring, allowing for the determination of what constitutes adequate response to intervention for ELLs learning to read in English.
  • 2013-2015 – “Innovation In Education: Enhancing And Expanding The Uw’s Prevention And Intervention Sciences Program,” Awarded By: University of Wisconsin – Madison, Craig A. Albers, Principal.
    Abstract: Consisting of a multidisciplinary community of researchers and practitioners, prevention science is the systematic study of efforts to reduce the incidence of maladaptive behavior and to promote adaptive behavior in populations across the life course. Training in the social and behavioral sciences usually includes intensive study within a single discipline for the purpose of contributing to a specific area of inquiry. Training in prevention sciences, however, requires expertise in a variety of theoretical and substantive perspectives for the purpose of conducting mission-oriented research and corresponding practice within the systems of the family, health and education, workplace, community, and social welfare. It also involves the application of this knowledge to real world problems and issues affecting people and the institutions and settings in which they live their lives. Thus, prevention sciences aims to enhance the social, emotional, and physical health of individuals and of communities, consistent with emerging trends in the human-service professions.
  • 2010-2014 – Amount: $1,600,000.00, “Validating Universal Screening And Progress Monitoring Instruments For Use With Ells In Response-To- Intervention Models.,” Awarded By: Institute of Education Sciences, Sponsor Type: Federal, David Kaplan, Co-Principal; Craig A. Albers, Principal; Thomas R. Kratochwill, Co-Principal.
  • 2007-2011 – Amount: $800,000.00, “Response-To-Intervention And School Reform: Training School Psychologists In The Wisconsin Reach Prevention Project,” Grant Institution: U.S. Department of Education, Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services, Sponsor Type: Federal, Craig A. Albers, Co-Principal; Thomas R. Kratochwill, Co-Principal; Kimber W. Malmgren, Co-Principal; Julie McGivern, Co-Principal; FUNDED.
    Abstract: This training program aims to serve as a model for collaboratively training special education and school psychology graduate students in RtI (response-to-intervention) and school reform. We propose to improve the quality and supply of personnel who serve children with disabilities in leadership roles by training doctoral level school psychology and special education graduate students in skills needed to implement systemic intervention, school reform, and RtI as part of a Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction statewide initiative called the Responsive Education for All Children (REACh). Fourteen doctoral students will be trained over 4 years. We anticipate that those benefiting from the skills developed by the trainees will include over 500 children and their families across Wisconsin. School personnel working with these children will acquire new knowledge about systemic interventions and school reform generally and about procedures associated with three-tiered RtI prevention models specifically.
  • 2007-2011 – Amount: $800,000.00, “Culturally Competent Evidence-Based Practices,” Awarded By: U.S. Department of Education, Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services, Sponsor Type: Federal, Craig A. Albers, Co-Principal; Thomas R. Kratochwill, Co-Principal; Julie McGivern, Co-Principal; Kimber W. Malmgren, Co-Principal; Hugh F. Johnston, Co-Principal; .
  • 2007-2011 – Amount: $800.00, “Training School Psychologists In Culturally Competent And Evidence-Based Practice For Children With Disabilities,” Awarded By: Office of Special Education Programs, Sponsor Type: Federal, Julie McGivern; Thomas R. Kratochwill; Craig A. Albers; Hugh F. Johnston.
  • 2008-2011 – Amount: $1,220,000.00, “The Development Of Alternate English Language Proficiency Assessment Procedures For English Language Learners With Significant Disabilities,” Awarded By: U.S. Department of Education, Sponsor Type: Federal, Craig A. Albers, Principal; FUNDED.
    Abstract: The Washington, DC Office of the State Superintendent of Education (OSSE), on behalf of the 17-state World-class Instructional Design and Assessment (WIDA) Consortium, proposes to develop and implement a feasible, accessible, valid, and efficient standards-based English language proficiency (ELP) alternate assessment system that yields technically sound results and facilitates the inclusion of English language learners (ELLs) with significant disabilities in educational accountability systems across the WIDA Consortium. This performance-based alternate assessment system will compliment and parallel the University of Wisconsin – Madison and WIDA’s evidence-based collection alternate ELP approach that is currently being field-tested within WIDA Consortium states. This new performance-based approach will give WIDA states the flexibility to implement alternate ELP assessments consistent with their existing alternate academic content assessments. The WIDA Consortium, which is located within the Wisconsin Center for Education Research (WCER) at the University of Wisconsin – Madison, will lead the development of this assessment through a cooperative agreement with the Washington, DC OSSE. The WIDA Consortium, originally established with funding from a U.S. Department of Education Enhanced Assessment Grant, currently includes Washington, DC and 16 additional states. Combined, the 17 WIDA partner states contain approximately 550,000 K-12 ELLs. Since 2003, WIDA has created and adopted comprehensive English language proficiency standards (2004, 2007) that represent the second language acquisition process and the language in the content areas of language arts, mathematics, science, and social studies. Based on these standards, WIDA developed a K-12 ELP test battery–ACCESS for ELLs–that approximately 420,000 students took in spring 2007. The ACCESS for ELLs is currently being used by more states than any other ELP measure. WIDA also provides professional development activities and maintains a Web site (www.wida.us). The proposed alternate ELP assessment system, named the Alternate ACCESS for ELLs with Significant Disabilities, will be designed to (a) meet the accountability requirements of the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001 and the Individuals with Disabilities Education Improvement Act of 2004, (b) meet the technical requirements of the Standards for Educational and Psychological Testing (American Educational Research Association, American Psychological Association, & National Council on Measurement in Education, 1999), (c) facilitate the involvement of ELLs in participating states’ accountability systems, (d) provide a method for monitoring the ELP growth of ELLs with significant disabilities, and (e) provide guidance to individualized education program (IEP) teams in developing appropriate language proficiency IEP goals and objectives. The development of this parallel form of the Alternate ACCESS for ELLs will follow key principles that require the assessment to (a) identify and assess skills that are critical to language proficiency development; (b) be aligned with the WIDA Consortium’s language proficiency standards; (c) be sensitive to student growth and accurately reflect students’ abilities in language areas; (d) lead to instructional opportunities that meet student needs; (e) provide reliable and valid results; (f) be non-biased and sensitive to cultural differences; (g) produce results that are helpful to teachers, parents, and administrators in making educational decisions; and (h) be time- and resource-efficient, as well as consistent with participating WIDA Consortium states’ existing academic content alternate assessment systems. A multi-part investigation using a multi-method, multi-source approach to developing and evaluating the alternate assessment will be used. Throughout all phases of the proposed alternate ELP assessment development and validation procedures, the involvement of WIDA Consortium states will increase the likelihood of participation by a culturally, geographically, and structurally diverse population of schools that will increase the generalizability of findings from the project. It is anticipated that we will be collecting data from a minimum of 300 schools within the consortium, including schools from each WIDA Consortium state. Although a variety of academic content assessments are available for use with ELLs with significant disabilities, there currently exist no alternate ELP assessments for ELL students with significant disabilities. Consequently, this project will advance theory, knowledge, and practice in the fields of assessment and instructional programs for ELLs with significant disabilities. We anticipate that the development and use of alternate ELP assessments for ELLs in the beginning stages of English language acquisition will prove to be a valid, reliable, and equitable way to assess the English language proficiency of ELLs with significant disabilities.
  • 2008-2009 – Amount: $14,900.00, “Early Identification Of Students With Learning Difficulties,” Awarded By: Society for the Study of School Psychology, Sponsor Type: Other, Craig A. Albers, Co-Principal; Ryan J. Kettler, Co-Principal; FUNDED.
  • 2006-2007 – Amount: $27,692.00, “The Development Of Alternate Assessment Procedures For English Language Learners With Significant Disabilities,” Awarded By: University of Wisconsin Graduate School Research Competition, Sponsor Type: University of Wisconsin-Madison, Craig A. Albers, Principal; FUNDED.
    Abstract: The No Child Left Behind Act of 2001 and the Individuals with Disabilities Education Improvement Act of 2004 require all students to participate in state and district-wide assessment systems. However, to date there has been no research conducted examining the participation of English Language Learners (ELLs) with significant disabilities in alternate assessment systems. The central goal of this project is to develop an efficient alternate assessment system that facilitates the inclusion of ELLs with significant disabilities in statewide educational accountability systems that result in valid, reliable, and useful information regarding their educational progress.
  • 2005-2006 – Amount: $9,428.00, “Early Identification Of Learning Difficulties Experienced By English Language Learners,” Awarded By: University of Wisconsin Graduate School Research Competition, Sponsor Type: University of Wisconsin-Madison, Craig A. Albers, Principal; FUNDED.
    Abstract: By nature of their second language status, students classified as English Language Learners (ELLs) are generally considered to be at-risk for academic failure. However, minimal research has been conducted exploring the degree to which universal screening procedures can distinguish between students who are experiencing academic difficulties beyond those associated with typical second-language acquisition. The proposed research project explores the degree to which a universal screening instrument, currently under development, can be utilized as is or modified as appropriate to identify second-language students experiencing additional risk factors relating to academic failure.

PUBLICATIONS

  • Albers, C.A., & Martinez, R. (2015). Promoting Academic Success with English Language Learners: Best Practices for RTI. Promoting Academic Success with English Language Learners: Best Practices for RTI. New York, New York: Guilford.
    Online Publication/Abstract
    Abstract: Educators and school psychologists throughout the country are working with growing numbers of English language learners (ELLs), but often feel unprepared to help these students excel. This highly informative book presents evidence-based strategies for promoting proficiency in academic English and improving outcomes in a response-to-intervention (RTI) framework. Illustrated with a detailed case example, the book describes best practices for working with K-5 ELLs in all stages of RTI: universal screening, progress monitoring, data collection, decision making, and intensifying instruction. In a large-size format with lay-flat binding for easy photocopying, the book includes more than two dozen reproducible worksheets. Purchasers get access to a Web page where they can download and print the reproducible materials.
  • Kettler, R.J., Glover, T.A., Albers, C.A., & Feeney-Kettler, K.A. (2014). Understanding the functions of screening and formative assessment. In R.J. Kettler, T.A. Glover, C.A. Albers, & K.A. Feeney-Kettler (Eds.), Universal screening in educational settings: Evidence based decision making for schools. Washington, DC: American Psychological Association.
    Online Publication/Abstract
  • Kettler, R.J., Glover, T.A., Albers, C.A., & Feeney-Kettler, K.A. (2014). Universal Screening in Educational Settings: Evidence-Based Decision Making for Schools. Washington, DC: American Psychological Association.
    Online Publication/Abstract
  • Albers, C.A., & Mission, P. (2014). Universal screening of English language learners: Language proficiency and literacy. In R.J. Kettler, T.A. Glover, C.A. Albers, & K.A. Feeney-Kettler (Eds.), Universal screening in educational settings: Evidence based decision making for schools. Washington, DC: American Psychological Association.
    Online Publication/Abstract
  • Kopriva, R., & Albers, C.A. (2013). Considerations for testing students with special needs. In K.F. Geisinger (Eds.), APA Handbook of Testing and Assessment in Psychology, (pp. 369-390). Washington, DC: American Psychological Association.
  • Albers, C.A., Mission, P.L., & Bice, B.J. (2013). Considering diverse learner characteristics in problem-solving assessment. In R. Brown-Chidsey & K. Andren (Eds.), Problem-solving based assessment for educational intervention, (pp. 101-122). New York: Guilford.
  • Albers, C.A., N, E.S., J, K.R., & T, R.A. (2013). Evaluating intervention outcomes. In R. Brown-Chidsey & K. Andren (Eds.), Problem-solving based assessment for educational intervention, (pp. 344-360). New York: Guilford.
  • Kettler, R.J., & Albers, C.A. (2013). Predictive validity of curriculum-based measurement and teacher ratings of academic achievement. Journal of School Psychology. 51(4), 499-515.
    Abstract: Two alternative universal screening approaches to identify students with early learning difficulties were examined, along with a combination of these approaches. These approaches, consisting of (a) curriculum-based measurement (CBM) and (b) teacher ratings using Performance Screening Guides (PSGs), served as predictors of achievement tests in reading and mathematics. Participants included 413 students in grades 1, 2, and 3 in Tennessee (n = 118) and Wisconsin (n = 295) who were divided into six subsamples defined by grade and state. Reading and mathematics achievement tests with established psychometric properties were used as criteria within a concurrent and predictive validity framework. Across both achievement areas, CBM probes shared more variance with criterion measures than did teacher ratings, although teacher ratings added incremental validity among most subsamples. PSGs tended to be more accurate for identifying students in need of assistance at a 1-month interval, whereas CBM probes were more accurate at a 6-month interval. Teachers indicated that (a) false negatives are more problematic than are false positives, (b) both screening methods are useful for identifying early learning difficulties, and (c) both screening methods are useful for identifying students in need of interventions. Collectively, these findings suggest that the two types of measures, when used together, yield valuable information about students who need assistance in reading and mathematics.
  • Albers, C.A. (2012). Alternate English language proficiency assessment for ELLs with significant disabilities: Validity evidence from alignment with Alternate English language proficiency standards. Journal of Educational and Psychological Assessment. 10, 97-124.
  • Albers, C.A., & Hoffman, A. (2012). Using flashcard drill methods and self-graphing procedures to improve the reading performance of ELLs. Journal of Applied School Psychology. 28, 367-388.
  • Grieve, A., Tluczek, A., Gilles, C.R., Laxova, A., Farrell, P., & Albers, C.A. (2011). Academic achievement of adolescents with cystic fibrosis: Associations with psychosocial variables. Journal of School Health. 81, 713-720.
  • Albers, C.A. (2011). Alternate English language proficiency standards. Madison, WI: University of Wisconsin, Wisconsin Center for Education Research.
  • Albers, C.A. (2011). Technical manual for the Alternate ACCESS for ELLs with Significant Cognitive Disabilities. Madison, WI: University of Wisconsin, Wisconsin Center for Education Research.
  • Albers, C.A. (2011). The Alternate ACCESS for ELLs with Significant Cognitive Disabilities. Madison, WI: University of Wisconsin, Wisconsin Center for Education Research.
    Online Publication/Abstract
  • Albers, C.A., Floyd, R., Fuhrmann, M., & Martinez, R. (2011). The peer review process in school psychology: A survey of criteria for publication and recommended areas of improvement. Journal of School Psychology. 49, 669-689.
  • Albers, C.A., & Kratochwill, T.R. (2010). Design of experiments. In P. Perterson, E. Baker, and B. McGraw (Eds.), International encyclopedia of education, (pp. 125-131). Oxford: Elsevier.
  • Albers, C.A., Hoffman, A., & Lundahl, A. (2009). Journal coverage of English Language Learners across student service professions: School psychology, special education, speech-language pathology, and counseling. School Psychology Review. 38, 121-134.
  • Albers, C.A., Kenyon, D., & Boals, T. (2009). Measures for determining English language proficiency and the resulting implications for instructional provision and intervention. Assessment for Effective Intervention. 34(2), 74-85.
  • Kettler, R.J., Elliott, S.N., & Albers, C.A. (2008). Early identification of students who need academic help: Validation of the Brief Academic Competence Evaluation Screening System. Journal of Psychoeducational Assessment. 26, 260-273.
  • Glover, T.A., & Albers, C.A. (2007). Coonsiderations for evaluating universal screening assessments. Journal of School Psychology. 45, 117-135.
  • Albers, C.A., Kratochwill, T.R., & Glover, T.A. (2007). Where are we and where do we go now? Universal screening for enhanced educational and mental health outcomes. Journal of School Psychology. 45, 257-263.
  • Albers, C.A., Elliott, S.N., Kettler, R.J., & Roach, A.T. (2005). Evaluating intervention outcomes. In R. Brown-Chidsey (Eds.), Problem-Solving Based Assessment for Educational Intervention, (pp. 329-351). New York: Guilford Publications.
  • Kratochwill, T.R., Albers, C.A., & Shernoff, E. (2004). School-based interventions. Child and Adolescent Psychiatric Clinics of North America. 13, 885-903.
  • Roberts, M.R., Marshall, J., Nelson, J.R., & Albers, C.A. (2001). Curriculum-based assessment procedures embedded within a functional behavioral assessment analysis: Identifying escape-motivated behaviors in a classroom settings. School Psychology Review. 30, 264-277.

PRESENTATIONS

  • Albers, C.A. (2012). Including English Language Learners in Classroom-Based Research, IES Project Directors’ Meeting, Institute for Education Sciences, Washington, DC.
  • Albers, C.A. (2011). Enhancing language proficiency and facilitating academic achievement for ELLs, Indiana State English Learner Conference, West LaFayette, IN.
  • Fuhrmann, M.J., & Albers, C.A. (2011). Validity evidence for scores on the Alternate ACCESS for ELLs., National Association of School Psychologists, San Francisco, CA.
  • Albers, C.A., Kettler, R.J., Forman, S.G., Feeney-Kettler, K., & Glover, T.A. (2010). Identifying students in need of assistance: Multi-stage and multi-method screening, American Psychological Association (APA), American Psychological Association (APA), San Diego, CA.
  • Albers, C.A., Grieve, A.J., Lundahl, A.A., Hoffman, A.J., & Holtzman, R.A. (2009). Universal screening and progress monitoring of students’ mathematics performance, American Psychological Association (APA), American Psychological Association (APA), Toronto, CA.
  • Albers, C.A., Lundahl, A.A., & Spalter, A. (2009). The development of English language proficiency alternate assessment procedures for ELLs with significant disabilities, American Educational Research Association (AERA), American Educational Research Association (AERA), San Diego, CA.
  • Lundahl, A.A., & Albers, C.A. (2009). Early identification of reading difficulties experienced by English language learners, National Association of School Psychologists (NASP), National Association of School Psychologists (NASP), Boston, MA.
  • Albers, C.A., & Horner, J. (2009). Implementing a comprehensive screening and progress monitoring system, National Association of School Psychologists (NASP), National Association of School Psychologists (NASP), Boston, MA.
  • Albers, C.A., & Kohl, R.F. (2009). Maximizing educational opportunities for English Language Learners, National Association of School Psychologists (NASP), National Association of School Psychologists (NASP), Boston, MA.
  • Albers, C.A., & Martinez, R. (2009). Perils of special education for ELLs: Emerging opportunities for ensuring equal education opportunities, Annual Statewide Conference for Teachers of Linguistically and Culturally Diverse Students, Illinois Resource Center (IRC), Arlington Heights, IL.
  • Ray-Subramanian, C., Presenter & Author, & Albers, C.A., Presenter & Author (2008). Including English Language Learners with disabilities in large-scale assessments: The need for alternate English language proficiency assessment procedures, American Educational Research Association (AERA), New York City, NY.

AWARDS AND HONORS

  • Catalyst Scholar
    Organization: Society for the Study of School Psychology
    Purpose: Scholarship/Research
    Scope: International
    Date(s): 2010
  • Mid-Career Scholar
    Organization: Society for the Study of School Psychology
    Purpose: Scholarship/Research
    Scope: International
    Date(s): 2010
  • Early Career Scholar
    Organization: National Institutes of Health
    Purpose: Scholarship/Research
    Scope: International
    Date(s): 2006
  • Early Career Scholar
    Organization: Society for the Study of School Psychology
    Purpose: Scholarship/Research
    Scope: International
    Date(s): 2005
  • Member
    Organization: Society for the Study of School Psychology
    Purpose: Scholarship/Research
    Scope: National
    Description: SSSP is devoted exclusively to recognizing and promoting scholarship and research.
    Date(s): 2012
  • Teaching Academy Fellow
    Organization: University of Wisconsin – Madison
    Purpose: Teaching
    Scope: UW Madison
    Date(s): 2012

PUBLIC SERVICE

  • Assessment for Effective Intervention
    Dates of Membership: 2010 – Pres.
  • Editorial Review Board Member.
  • School Psychology Review
    Dates of Membership: 2010 – Pres.
  • Editorial Review Board Member.
  • School Psychology Summit for Collaborative Scholarship
    Dates of Membership: 2008 – 2011
  • Committee Member.
  • Journal of Applied School Psychology
    Dates of Membership: 2005 – Pres.
  • Board Member.
  • Journal of School Psychology
  • Associate Editor. Period of Service: 2010 – Pres.
  • Board Member. Period of Service: 2006 – Pres.
  • School Psychology Quarterly
  • Editorial Review Board Member. Period of Service: 2011 – Pres.
  • Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction, Responsive Education for All Children (REACh) Mentor.
  • School Psychology Research Collaboration Conference
  • Committee Chair. Period of Service: 2008 – 2009
  • Committee Co-Chair. Period of Service: 2006 – 2007

EDUCATION

Ph D, Educational Psychology – School Psychology
Arizona State University
Tempe, AZ

M Ed, Educational Psychology – School Psychology
Arizona State University
Tempe, AZ

BA, Psychology, Sociology, Magna cum laude
University of Minnesota
Minneapolis, MN