Human Development Graduate Students

MAAME ADOMAKO

Maame Adomako is PhD student in the Human Development area. She received a B.A. from Central Michigan University, where she double majored in Psychology and Sociology with a Youth Studies Concentration. Her professional and research experiences are aimed toward enhancing leadership and diversity among adolescents in education. Her skills include multicultural programming, tutoring and mentoring high and middle school students.

Research Interests:

Maame is former scholar of the Summer Education Research Program at UW-Madison during which her research focused on the racial and ethnic differences in student satisfaction of college on a predominantly white campus and the implications of social and academic adjustment for students’ satisfaction with college. Currently advised by Dr. Brad Brown her research interests include examining the transition processes among underrepresented students in higher education. Specifically, she explores the impact of social and academic experiences on identity development and achievement.

Publications:

  • Acevedo-Polakovich, I.D., Cousineau, J. M., Quirk, K.M., Gerhart, J.I., & Adomako, M.S.(2013).  Toward an asset orientation in the study of U.S. Latina/o youth: Biculturalism, ethnic identity, and positive youth development. The Counseling Psychologist (4) 41
  • Adomako, M.S., Brown, B.B., & Yang, C. (April, 2013). What Explains Ethnic Differences in Satisfaction Among Students on a Predominantly White Campus. Poster presented at the 2013 Society for Research in Child Development Conference. Seattle, WA.
  • Adomako, M.S., Smith, J., & Garrison, A. (November, 2012). Breaking the Silence: LGBTQ Allies on Campus. Poster presented at the 2012 American Association of Criminology Conference. Chicago, IL.

CATHERINE BREDEMANN

Catherine Bredemann is a sixth-year graduate student in the Educational Psychology graduate studies program. Catherine earned her B.S. in Psychology from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign in 2014. Upon finishing the prerequisites for her psychology degree, she enrolled in courses geared toward teacher training, including courses on educational psychology, policy, and practice. She also has experience in the classroom, having been a preschool teacher for a short time. Catherine now works in the Learning, Cognition, and Development laboratory with Haley Vlach studying in the Human Development area. She earned her M.S. in Educational Psychology in 2017.

In her research, Catherine examines language learning and memory processes in young children and adults. She is particularly interested in cognitive development, and through this research she attempts to answer questions about how our knowledge of cognitive mechanisms and theory can be applied to young children’s learning in educational settings and in the home through such materials as storybooks and educational apps.

JOHN BINZAK

John Binzak is an educational game designer and researcher completing his PhD in the Human Development area.  His work explores questions at the intersection of neuroscience, cognitive development, and education. From brains to games, John applies his interdisciplinary approach to study how students learn mathematical concepts, and the impact of educational multimedia, such as video games, in this learning. In recognition of his work, John received the 2018 Exceptional Trainee Award by the International Mind, Brain, & Education Society.

Education:

  • S. Educational Psychology, University of Wisconsin – Madison, 2016
  • Ed. Mind, Brain, & Education, Harvard Graduate School of Education, 2012
  • S. Psychology & Neurobiology, University of Wisconsin – Madison, 2010

Research Interests

John’s research follows two strands of inquiry. 1) How does the visual complexity and context of educational media impact learning math and science? 2) How can we use interactive digital media (e.g. video games) and data from these experiences as research tools to understand learners’ abilities in real life contexts?

Selected Presentations

  • Binzak, J.V., Matthews, P.G., Hubbard, E.M. (2019, June). Confidence counts: Relationships between math dispositions and fractions knowledge. Poster presented at the 2nd Annual Meeting of the Mathematical Cognition and Learning Conference, Ottawa, Canada.
  • Binzak, J.V. (2018, October). From Brains to Games: Investigations of Symbolic and Nonsymbolic Ratio Processing with fMRI and Gameplay Data. Talk presented at the International Mind, Brain, and Education Society Conference, Los Angeles, CA.
  • Binzak, J.V., Toomarian, E.Y., Matthews, P.G., & Hubbard, E.M. (2018, July). Fractions War: An iOS game to measure and train magnitude processing with fractions. Poster presented at the 40th Annual Meeting of the Cognitive Science Society, Madison, WI.
  • Binzak, J.V., Toomarian, E.Y., & Hubbard, E.M. (2017, March). Overlapping Neural Representation of Magnitude Support Understanding Nonsymbolic and Symbolic Fractions. Poster presented at the 24th Annual Meeting of the Cognitive Neuroscience Society, San Francisco, CA.
  • Binzak, J.V., Anderson, C.G., J., Kumar, V., Jordan-Douglass, A., & Berland. (2016, August). Comparing gameplay across formal and informal contexts.  Extended Abstract presented at the Digital Games Research Association and the Foundations of Digital Games Conferences, Dundee, Scotland.

ANGELA CALVIN

Angie Calvin is a doctoral student in the Human Development area of the Department of Educational Psychology at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Her primary research interests focus on the risks and opportunities of social media use on the psychosocial development of adolescents. Particularly, she is interested in the implications of social media on relationships with parents and peers.

Publications

Bellmore, A., Resnik, F., Olson, C., Calvin, A., & Brummer, M. (2018). Trolls/Trolling. In Hobbs & Mihailidis. (Eds). International Encyclopedia of Media Literary.

Bellmore, A., Calvin. J., Xu, J-M., & Zhu, X. (2015). The 5 W’s of “bullying” on Twitter: Who, What, Why, Where, When. Computers in Human Behavior, 44, 305-314.

Calvin, A. J., Bellmore, A., Xu, J-M., & Zhu, X. (2014). #bully: Uses of Hashtags in Posts About Bullying on Twitter. Journal of School Violence, 14, 133-153.

LEANDRO CHERNICOFF

Leandro Chernicoff is a graduate student in the Human Development area. He is interested in the development of cognitive, affective and behavioral skills to foster well-being and alleviate suffering. This started as a personal quest, and for the last six years he has collaborated as Academic Director of AtentaMente, a Mexican nonprofit focused on teaching these very skills to adults, children, and teens. He is also a physicist and a full-time professor at UACM, one of three public universities in Mexico City, teaching college level math and physics for the last 14 years.

Education:

  • B.A., Physics, UNAM, Mexico.
  • M.S., Physics, UNAM, Mexico.

Leandro has developed a curriculum to promote attention, emotion regulation as well as prosocial behavior, conducting research to assess its efficacy. Different variations of this curriculum are being developed and implemented for the general public, the workplace and in educational settings in Mexico.

Through an iterative process of curriculum development, implementation and research, he hopes to develop a comprehensive, evidence-based well-being training program.

TINGTING FAN

Tingting is a PhD student in the Human Development area. Her research broadly draws on peer relationship and social media in adolescence and emerging adulthood. Besides research, she has been involved in working with nonprofit organizations, such as DreamNovation, to support youth in rural China with various interventions. From undergraduate years to graduate years, her roles evolved from summer camp mentor, site observer to co-research founder, and summer program director.

Education

  • MS Ed, University of Pennsylvania
  • BA Psychology, Beloit College

Research Interests

She interested in how the ecological environment has shaped adolescents throughout their development with considerations on the complexity of youth’s social relationships, mass media, and cultural differences. Her projects investigating how social media play a role in college transitions among international students, and how youth’s social media activity may impact their emotional change and behaviors in romantic relationships.

Presentations

Fan, T., Li, X., Nakkula, M. (2019, Oct). A cross–cultural study of influence of perceived inter-parental relationships on emerging adults’ romantic relationships, considering gender differences. Paper presented at the Society for the Study of Emerging Adulthood (SSEA) 2019 Biennial Meeting.

Hill, K.C., Li, X., Fan, T., Plaskett, S.,Bali, D., Nakkula, M., Harris John (2019,Oct). Implications for First-Generation, Low-Income (FGLI) Minority Freshmen Transitioning from an Urban Area to a Rural College, and How Mentorship Programs Can Promote a Smooth Transition. Poster presented at the Society for the Study of Emerging Adulthood (SSEA) 2019 Biennial Meeting.

Calvin, A., Fan, T., Bellmore A., Resnik F., Huang H. (2016, April). School-Related Hashtags: Age Differences in Hashtag and Word Usage among Bullying TweetsPoster presented at the Society for Research on Adolescence (SRA) 2016 Biennial Meeting.

Book Chapter

Hill, K.C., Li, X., Fan, T., Plaskett, S.,Bali, D., Nakkula, M., Harris John (manuscript in preparation). Implications for First-Generation, Low-Income (FGLI) Minority Freshmen Transitioning from an Urban Area to a Rural College, and How Mentorship Programs Can Promote a Smooth Transition.

PAULINE HO

Pauline Ho is a third year Ph.D. student in the Human Development area of the Educational Psychology department, where she is advised by Dr. Brad Brown. Pauline graduated cum laude from the University of California, Irvine where she double majored in Education Sciences and Social Policy and Public Service. Her research at UC-Irvine have primarily focused on investigating effective pedagogies for teaching English and discipline-specific knowledge to diverse student learners. In addition to research, Pauline has a variety of experiences working with students, including peer mentoring, scholarship advising, and academic tutoring.

Research Interests

Following the work that she had already began as an undergraduate, Pauline’s research interests now focus on investigating factors that influence students’ college transition and experiences in higher education. More specifically, she aims to explore the relationship between student’s identity development (various domains) and their educational experiences in college. Currently, she is the Study Director of the Belonging in College study in Dr. Brown’s Peer Relations Study Group. As a project assistant WIDA, she has taken part in research projects that focus on English Learners from a range of age groups.

Education

  • A. Education Sciences, University of California, Irvine, 2017
  • A. Social Policy and Public Service, University of California, Irvine, 2017

Awards and Honors

  • UW-Madison’s Education Graduate (Ed-GRS) Fellowship
  • Wisconsin Center for Education Research (WCER) Fellowship
  • Ford Predoctoral Fellowship 2018 Honorable Mention
  • NSF’s Graduate Research Fellowship 2017 Honorable Mention
  • AERA 2017 Annual Meeting’s Undergraduate Fellow
  • 2017 Who’s Who in Asian American Communities (WWAAC)’s Leaders & Legends Honoree

Conference presentations

  • Ho, P. & Stillwell, C. (2018, March). ELLs Interviewing ELLs: Contributing Data to Discussions of Higher Education. Paper presented at the 2018 American Association for Applied Linguistics Annual Conference.
  • Ho, P., Nili, A.N., Reimer, L.C. (2017, April). Using Coh-Metrix to Analyze Writing Cohesion in Introductory Courses with and without Learning Assistants. Paper presented at the American Educational Research Association (AERA) 2017 Annual Meeting.
  • Ho, P., Su, P & Nili, A. (2016, May). Using Coh-Metrix to Analyze Writing Cohesion in Introductory Courses with and without Learning Assistants.Poster presented at the annual Data Science Initiative Spring Symposium, “Fostering Literacy and Learning with Text and Data Mining,” Irvine, CA.
  • Ho, P., & Su, P. (2016, May). Investigating teaching practices in writing 39A classrooms for English as Second Language (ESL) Learners. Research presented at the Undergraduate Research Opportunity Program (UROP) Annual Symposium, Irvine, CA.

HUI-RU HO

Hui-Ru is a graduate student in Human Development area in the Department of Educational Psychology. She received her B.S. in Psychology (minor in Economics) from National Taiwan University, where she has done some research on audio-visual integration. In 2018, she came to University of Wisconsin—Madison for a one-year visit, which was fully funded by a scholarship given by Taiwanese government. Then, she decided to apply for graduate school in the same year and continue her study in Madison. Her research interest broadly focuses on multi-sensory integration, and she also had some experience in Taiwanese industry in Human—Computer Interaction and User Experience.

Education

B.S. Psychology (minor in Economics), National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan, 2019

Research Interests

Hui-Ru is passionate about doing research in the field of multi-sensory integration. She is particularly interested in studying the relationship of multi-sensory integration and cognition. Moreover, she is looking forward to applying what she has learned in multi-sensory integration to education and improving user experience of technology in the future.

RON HOPKINS

Ron Hopkins is a first-year graduate student in the Human Development area of Educational Psychology. His academic background is primarily in the historical, theoretical, and philosophical foundations of human reasoning. Throughout his undergraduate and graduate career at the University of West Georgia he served as the Research Coordinator for the psychology department’s Research Laboratory. He trained undergraduates on research methods and provided in-class demonstrations of EEG equipment for psychology classes. While earning his Master’s degree in Psychology, he worked as a graduate assistant in the Distance and Distributed Education department, training and assisting faculty members in developing online courses.

Education

A. in Psychology, University of West Georgia, Carrollton, GA.

Research Interests

Ron is interested in mathematical cognition, particularly how students come to associate meaning to the symbols and rules of symbol manipulation necessary for mathematics. He is especially interested in how these associations influence reasoning and how these associations change over time. This involves trying to understand the nature of processes underlying symbolic meaning and mathematical knowledge in the hopes of developing methods for identifying problems and designing effective interventions.

Presentations

  • “Situated Mathematical Cognition and Epistemology in Algebraic Reasoning: Implications for Young Learners”   Student Psychology Annual Research Conference University of West Georgia, Carrollton, GA: April, 2014 “Ethical Epistemic Methodology in the Social Sciences” Midwinter ConferenceAPA Division 24, Atlanta, GA: March, 2014
  • “What is the Cognitive Science of Mathematics?” Invited Presentation for Foundations of Neuroscience CourseUniversity of West Georgia, Carrollton, GA: November, 2013
  • “Semiotics, Semantics, and The Linguistic Turn in Philosophy”   Invited Presentation for Language and Culture CourseUniversity of West Georgia, Carrollton, GA: October, 2013
  • “From Zero to Infinity: Paradoxical Cognitive Metaphors and Number Theory” Student Psychology Annual Research Conference University of West Georgia, Carrollton, GA: April, 2013
  • “The Convenient Relativist: The Question of Plastic Epistemology” North Georgia Student Philosophy Conference Kennesaw State University, Kennesaw, GA: December, 2012
  • “Thought and Identity: Cognition, Education, Society and Authenticity” Student Psychology Annual Research Conference University of West Georgia, Carrollton, GA: April, 2012
  • “Learning Orientations: Changing Educational Perspectives” Student Psychology Annual Research Conference University of West Georgia, Carrollton, GA: April, 2011

WONGEUN JI

Wongeun Ji is a graduate student in the Human Development area. After completing undergraduate degree at Korea University, he worked in the field of criminal and juvenile justice for ten years as a correctional officer and a deputy director of the juvenile division of the Ministry of Justice, Korea. He is also a Fulbright student.

Education

B.A. in Education, Korea University, 2007

Research interests

Based on work experience and his passion for youth offenders, Wongeun hopes to make a contribution to the healthy development of youth offenders who were victimized in the past. His interests center on the role of morality as a protective factor for delinquency prevention, and the improvement of correctional treatment by applying forgiveness education to detained youth.

JULIE JOHNSON

Julie Johnson is a doctoral student in the Human Development area of the Educational Psychology program of UW-Madison. During her Educational Leadership and Policy Analysis Master’s program at Ohio State University,  she examined service-learning as a catalyst for college student moral & cognitive development. She presented at the NASPA region IV-E conference in 2009 where she integrated service-learning research with development theory to examine and critique undergraduate service-learning courses and proposed better theory-to-practice programmmg.

Seeking hands-on leadership programming experience, Julie served as an AmeriCorps member working with a conservation program aimed at developing civic engagement among young adults. She also served as an instructor at Indiana University’s Outdoor Education Center facilitating leadership development, group development, and personal growth programs in outdoor challenge settings for children and adults of all ages.

A growing curiosity in non-violent conflict resolution and peace studies brought Julie to UW Madison’s Human Development program to work with Dr. Robert Enright – an academic leader in moral development and forgiveness education. Julie is currently working on various research projects aimed at understanding the developmental nature of forgiveness.

Presentations:

  • Hunt, J.C., Kim, J. & Enright, R. (2013, November). Cross-cultural analysis: The Enright Forgiveness Inventory in Ukraine. Poster presented at the annual Association for Moral Education conference, Montreal, Quebec.
  • Hunt, J. (2014, May). Because after all, a person is a person, no matter how small. Healthy Classroom Symposium.Lecture conducted from University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI.

MELINA KNABE

Melina Knabe is a third-year Ph.D. student interested in how variation in context and language learning history affects early word learning. In addition to studying language acquisition, she investigates individual differences in children’s memory development. Ultimately, she hopes to apply her work to language learning settings in classrooms and the home. Melina is being advised by Dr. Haley Vlach.

Teaching

Conducted guest lectures on language development in early childhood for Ed Psych 320.

Served as a teaching assistant for a Nutritional Neuroscience and Statistical Methods & Research Design course at Washington and Lee University in the fall of 2016.

Publications

Sarfert, K. S., Knabe, M. L., Gunawansa, N. S., & Blythe, S. N. (in print). Western-style diet induces object recognition deficits and alters complexity of dendritic arborization in the hippocampus and entorhinal cortex of male rats. Nutritional Neuroscience.

Knabe, M. L., Sarfert, K. S., Gunawansa, N. S., & Blythe, S. N. (manuscript in preparation). Western-style diet alters neuronal morphology in the hippocampus and entorhinal cortex of ovariectomized female rats with and without estradiol.

Knabe, M. L., Sarfert, K. S., & Blythe, S. N. (manuscript in preparation). Cafeteria-style diet impairs memory and increases risk of metabolic syndrome.

Knabe, M. L. & Vlach, H. A. (in prep). Learning in context: Children’s memory and attention for features of a word learning episode.

Presentations

Knabe, M. L. & Vlach, H. A. (2019, June). Learning in context: mono- and bilingual children’s memory and attention for features of a word learning episode. 40th Annual Society for Research on Child Language Disorders, Madison, Wisconsin.

Knabe, M. L. & Vlach, H. A. (2019, March). Learning in context: Children’s memory and attention for features of a word learning episode. 2019 Society for Research in Child Development, Baltimore, Maryland.

Knabe, M. L. & Blythe, S. N. (2017, May). Language translates to executive functions: Investigating the bilingual advantage in inhibitory control. Poster presented at the Virginia Academy of Science Annual Meeting, Richmond, Virginia.

Knabe, M. L. & Blythe, S. N. (2017, March). Language translates to executive functions: Investigating the bilingual advantage in inhibitory control. Poster presented at the Science, Society and the Arts Conference, Lexington, Virginia.

Knabe, M. L., Sarfert, K. S., & Blythe, S. N. (2017, March). Western-style diet differentially impacts neuroanatomy and memory performance of female and male rats. Poster presented at the Central Virginia Society for Neuroscience Symposium.

Knabe, M. L. & Blythe, S. N. (2017, March). Language translates to executive functions: Investigating the bilingual advantage in inhibitory control. Poster presented at the Central Virginia Society for Neuroscience Symposium.

Knabe, M. L. & Blythe, S. N. (2016, October). Language translates to executive functions: Investigating the bilingual advantage in inhibitory control. Poster presented at the Virginia Academy of Science Fall Undergraduate Research Meeting, Richmond, Virginia.

Knabe, M. L. & Sarfert, K. S. (2015, December). The central and peripheral effects of estrogen and diet-induced obesity. Presentation held at the Washington and Lee University Biology Seminar Series, Lexington, Virginia.

Pogrebna, V., Knabe, M. L., Blythe, S. N., Toporikova, N. (2015, November). A tale of two diet experiments – investigating interactions between diet and reproductive hormones. Poster presented at the American Physiological Society – Cardiovascular, Renal, and Metabolic Diseases: Physiology and Gender Conference, Annapolis, Maryland.

Knabe, M. L., Sarfert, K. S., Guider, J., Caldwell, T., & Maximova, A. (2015, June). The effects of diet-induced obesity on physiology, behavior, and fertility. Presentation held at the 2015 Washington and Lee University Summer Research Scholars Seminar Series, Lexington, Virginia.

Knabe, M. L., Sarfert, K. S., & Blythe, S. N. (2015, May). Food for thought: Cafeteria-style diet impairs memory and increases risk of metabolic syndrome. Poster presented at the Virginia Academy of Science Annual Meeting, Harrisonburg, Virginia.

Knabe, M. L., Sarfert, K. S., & Blythe, S. N. (2014, November). Food for thought: Cafeteria-style diet impairs memory and increases risk of metabolic syndrome. Poster presented at the Society for Neuroscience Annual Meeting, Washington, D. C.

Curtiss, S., Knabe, M. L. & Sarfert, K. S. (2014, June). A diet to remember: From McDonald’s to Memory Loss. Presentation held at the 2014 Washington and Lee University Summer Research Scholars Seminar Series, Lexington, Virginia.

MARY CATE KOMOSKI

Mary Cate Komoski is a doctoral student in the Educational Psychology Department, Human Development Area. She received a B.Ed. in Child Development and Family Studies from the University of North Carolina- Chapel Hill in 2013. She then worked as a kindergarten teacher at a Title I school in Durham, North Carolina for two years. She now studies and works as a part of Dr. Robert Enright’s Forgiveness Lab.

Research Interests

Mary Cate’s interests focus on the relationship between early-life trauma and later juvenile criminal behavior, specifically focusing on family conflict and trauma. Her interests also extend into trauma-informed systems and what role they should play in juvenile delinquency.

EMMA LAZAROFF

Emma Lazaroff is a fourth-year Ph.D. student in the Human Development program in the Department of Educational Psychology.  Emma received her B.A. in Psychology from Quinnipiac University and was a lab manager at Boston College prior to pursuing her Ph.D.   Her research interests lie in how children use cognitive supports such as analogy and language to learn about science and mathematics, as well as how they generalize this knowledge to increasingly complex concepts. In particular, she is interested in determining how these concepts can be organized to help children most effectively retain information. Emma is being advised by Dr. Haley Vlach.

PEMA LHAMO

Pema Lhamo is currently a first-year graduate student in Human Development program in the Department of Educational Psychology. She is very passionate about doing a research that aims towards making our communities more compassionate and kinder. Pema is a Tibetan, born and raised in the northern Himalayan region of India! She completed all her schooling from the Tibetan Children Village (TCV) school.

Education

  • BS: (Hons.) Biomedical Science, Delhi University, India
  • MS: Life Sciences, Jawaharlal Nehru University, India

Research

Pema is currently contributing to a large scale research project in Mexico that aims to foster the well-being of children and adults in the school environment by introducing social and emotional learning curricula. She is also interested in understanding how practices that foster compassion can influence well-being and how such practices may strengthen relationships between individuals and larger communities.

 

KATHERINE NORMAN

Katherine is a student in Dr. Ed Hubbard’s Educational Cognitive Neurology lab. She completed her MA in Interdisciplinary Theatre Studies with a concentration in Theatre for Young Audiences at the UW Madison in 2018, and transitioned to Ed Psych to better pursue her research questions regarding drama and cognitive development. In addition to research, Katherine is also an active teaching artist and actor (Equity Membership Candidate).

Education

BFA Acting | University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign – 2012

MA Interdisciplinary Theatre Studies | University of Wisconsin, Madison – 2018

Research

Katherine’s research currently focuses on the duality between reality and pretend in both make-believe play and dramatic practice/performance, and how that duality affects cognitive development. Specifically, she is interested in how drama practices might mutually effect the interlocking systems of executive functioning skills and stress/cortisol levels for early elementary students.

Teaching

UW-Madison teaching experience:

  • TA/Instructor of Record | Drama for Teaching and Learning | T&D/C&I/Slavic 362 | current
  • TA/Discussion Leader | Intro to Dramatic Literature | T/D 120 | 3 semesters

Selected teaching artist experience:

  • UW Madison Arts Collaboratory | Whoopensocker | Teaching artist and performer | 2016-present
  • UW Madison, Oakhill Prison Humanities Project | Theatre and Drama class | Teaching Artist | 2017-present
  • Children’s Theatre of Madison | Teaching Artist | 2016-present
  • Kattaikkuttu Gurukulam, Tamil Nadu, India | Resident Teaching Artist | 2015-2016
  • Interlochen Center for the Arts, Interlochen, MI | Intermediate Acting Co. | Associate Director | 2013-2016
  • Maher Ashram, Maharashtra, India | Guest Teaching Artist | four residencies from 2014-present

Presentations

  • Kennedy Center American College Theatre Festival (2012) “The Myth of Résistance: An Analysis of Anouilh’s Antigone” (Winner of the KCACTF Undergraduate Theatre Scholar award for best             original research in the US)
  • Undergraduate Research Symposium at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (2012) “More than a Mirror: An Etymological and Neurological Approach to Empathy in The Theatre” –            keynote speaker
  • University of Wisconsin, Madison Graduate Conference on English Language and Literature (2017) “Burning the Body: Gnostic Thought in Artaud and Grotowski”
  • International Association of Theatre for Children and Young People (ASSITEJ) World Conference: Cape Town (2017) “The Kattaikkuttu Gurukulam: A Model of Integrated Arts Education”
  • University of Wisconsin, Madison, Theatre Department Graduate Student Organization Conference (2018) “Triadic Interplay: Stress, Executive Functions, and Drama in Education”

NAHLAH MANDURAH

Nahlah Mandurah is a doctoral student in the Human Development area of the Educational Psychology program under the supervision of Dr. Robert Enright. Nahlah received her bachelor degree in Kindergarten from Umm Al.Qura University in Saudi Arabia. In addition to the human development courses, she also did a field training teaching in school for a period of time. Throughout her bachelor program and field training, Nahlah has become interested in human development and how curriculum can promote the students’ psychological well-being. In 2010 Nahlah earned a master’s degree from the University of Western Sydney in Australia. Before joining the PhD program at UW-Madison, Nahlah worked at King Abdullah University.

YANZHUO “AMY” NIU

Amy Niu is a first year PhD student in Human Development Area in the Department of Educational Psychology. Prior to her attending to U.S., she was involved in a volunteer program and working as a middle school teacher in China. This experience helped to acquaint her with the social dynamics of adolescent peer relations. She was intrigued by how the clash between teacher or parent expectations and peer demands can undermine healthy adolescent development.

Education:

  • A. Changchun University of Science & Technology

Research Interests:

Working with Prof. Brad Brown and other members of the Peer Relations Study Group, her research interest currently centers on the association between the social networking sites (SNS) use and international students’ adjustment to college life in U.S. In her first year project, she will mainly examine (1) how international students build their identities in online settings (e.g. facebook) as a transition strategy (2) how they balance their relations with their old friends which are left behind in their home country and new connections which are established after they arrived on campus by participating in different social networking sites.

CHELSEA OLSON

Chelsea Olson is a graduate student in the Human Development Area of Educational Psychology. She received a B.A. in psychology from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. She is a part of Dr. Amy Bellmore’s research group.

Research Interests

Her research interests include peer relationships, peer victimization, cyber victimization, and mental health outcomes. She’s also interested in investigating social media and victimization on those platforms. She’d also like to examine anti-bullying prevention and intervention programs, with a long-term goal being to help develop an effective anti-bullying and anti-cyberbullying program.

YUNJI PARK

Yunji Park is a Ph.D. student in the Educational Psychology department studying numerical cognition. She majored in Physics and Psychology in her undergraduate years. After graduating, she started to working in a cognitive neuroscience lab, primarily investigating the development of magnitude representations among elementary school children. She is currently investigating the developmental trajectories of the ratio processing system using behavioral and neuroimaging approaches.

Education

M.A. in Cognition and Perception, Department of Psychology, Chung-Ang University, Seoul, Korea

B.S. in Physics and B.A. in Psychology, Chung-Ang University, Seoul, Korea

Publications

Park, Y., Binzak, J.V., Kalra, P., Matthews, P.G., & Hubbard, E.M. (in preparation). Developmental changes in children’s processing of nonsymbolic ratio magnitudes: A cross-sectional fMRI study.

Park, Y., Binzak, J.V., Dean, D.C.3rd, Alexander, A.L., Matthews, P.G., & Hubbard, E.M. (in preparation). Developmental changes in white matter tracts for symbolic and non-symbolic fractions.

Park, Y. & Cho, S. (in preparation). Area Acuity better predicts Mathematical Achievement over Number Acuity in Elementary School Children.

Park, Y. & Cho, S. (2017). Developmental Changes in the Relationship between Magnitude Acuities and Mathematical Achievement in Elementary School Children. Educational Psychology, 37(7), 873-887.

Park, Y. & Cho, S. (2014). Comparing Construct and Predictive Validities of the Measurement of Children’s Approximate Number Acuity Depending on Numerosity Comparison Task Format. Korean Journal of Cognitive Sciences, 25(2), 79-101

ROBBY QUINTANA

Robby Quintana is a first year PhD student in the Human Development Area of Educational Psychology.

Robby graduated from Gustavus Adolphus College where he earned a B.A. in Psychology. After graduation, Robert worked at an alternative school, where he served as a teaching assistant in a classroom for children with emotional/behavior difficulties. He also worked a Behavioral Technician at Wisconsin’s Early Autism Program and as a math tutor for Schools of Hope in the MMSD school district.

Robby is interested in how the development of specific cognitive abilities influence intermediate and advanced mathematical competencies. He hopes this research will contribute towards interventions that may help at-risk children succeed in their formal mathematics. In his downtime, he likes to spend his time managing his clothing business, taking long walks in areas with vegetation, and watching and playing sports.

 

HANNAH RAPP

Hannah Rapp is a Ph.D. candidate in the Human Development Area of Educational Psychology. She is a member of the Enright Forgiveness Lab.  Hannah earned a B.A. in Psychology at Wheaton College, IL, as well as minors in English and Biblical Archaeology. After college, Hannah did behavioral counseling in a residential facility for children with OCD and worked in a lab, at the same facility, researching adult OCD. Her current research interests include Forgiveness Education and its application in elementary and secondary school settings, and child and adolescent hope and emotional well-being. In her free time, Hannah enjoys playing ultimate frisbee, ice cream, and spending time with friends and family.

Research Interests

  • Forgiveness and child resiliency
  • Human understanding of the idea of “inherent worth”
  • Forgiveness Therapy and its applications for individuals with low distress tolerance
  • Social Emotional Learning

Presentations

  • George, Limberger, Loynachan, Case, Oury, & Rueger (2015, August 9) The Mediating Effects of Self-Esteem in the Relationship Between Attributional Style for Positive Events & Depression. Poster session presented at the 2015 Annual American Psychological Association Conference, Toronto, ON, 2015.

ISABELLA STARLING ALVES

Isabella Starling Alves is a graduate student in Human Development area in the Department of Educational Psychology. She is interested in the integration between neurosciences and education, and has experience working on developmental disorders, with focus on developmental dyscalculia.

Education:

  • M.A. Neurosciences, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Brazil
  • B.A. Psychology, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Brazil

Research Interests:

Isabella is interested in numerical cognition, especially in the association between nonsymbolic and symbolic magnitudes processing. Currently, she works on nonsymbolic ratio processing, on the LAMBDA project (https://website.education.wisc.edu/lambda/).

Publications:

Haase, V. G., & Starling‐Alves, I. (2017). In search of the moral-psychological and neuroevolutionary basis of political partisanship. Dementia & Neuropsychologia, 11 (1): 15-23.

Júlio‐Costa, A., Starling-Alves, I., Lopes-Silva, J. B., Wood , G., & Haase, V. G. (2015). Stable measures of number sense accuracy in math learning disability: Is it time to proceed from basic science to clinical application?. PsyCh journal, 4(4), 218-225.

Haase, V. G., Júlio-Costa, A., Lopes-Silva, J. B., Starling-Alves, I., Antunes, A. M., Pinheiro-Chagas, P., & Wood, G. (2014). Contributions from specific and general factors to unique deficits: two cases of mathematics learning difficulties. Frontiers in Psychology, 5, 102.

Pinheiro-Chagas, P. , Wood, G., Knops, A., Krinzinger, H., Lonnemann, J., Starling-Alves, I, Willmes, K., & Haase, V. G. (2014). In How Many Ways is the Approximate Number System Associated with Exact Calculation?. PLoS one, 9, e111155.

PRISCILLA TOVAR-PEREZ

Priscilla Tovar-Perez is a first-year Ph.D. student in the Educational Psychology Department, Human Development area. Priscilla is part of Dr. Amy Bellmore’s research team, which focuses on school-based peer relationships during adolescence. Growing up in San Antonio, Texas, she has become highly interested on the impact of environmental factors on educational outcomes.

ALEXANDRIA VIEGUT

Alexandria Viegut is a Ph.D. student in the Human Development area studying children’s cognitive development and mathematical learning. Her interest in children’s learning was sparked by experiences volunteering in classrooms and as a math tutor. She works with Percival Matthews in the Math Education Learning and Development lab.

Education

  • B.A., Psychology, University of Notre Dame, 2017

Research Interests

Alex is broadly interested in how different visual representations of math concepts (symbols, number lines, diagrams, gestures, etc.) influence children’s math reasoning in elementary and middle school. Her current work focuses on developing and testing interventions to help children employ their nonsymbolic proportional reasoning skills to support their understanding of symbolic fractions.

BROOKE WOLLNER

Brooke Wollner is a graduate student in the Human Development area of the Educational Psychology department at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. During her undergraduate career Brooke studied female prisoners of the Federal Bureau of Prisons. She presented her research on male versus female prison experience, child rearing and visitation rights, and familial dynamics within the female prison population at the American Society of Criminology Conference in 2014.

As a McNair Scholar (2014-2015 cohort), she studied in Northern Ireland while doing research that examined the relationship between oral history interviews with terrorists and the efforts of a society to maintain peace, justice, and understanding. Her research specifically focused on the Northern Ireland Troubles, the conflict between the Irish Republican Army (IRA) and Ulster Volunteer Force (UVF), as well as the ethics of data collection and distribution.

Education

  • B.S. in Psychology, University of Wisconsin-Oshkosh, Oshkosh, Wisconsin (2015)
  • B.S. in Criminal Justice, University of Wisconsin-Oshkosh, Oshkosh, Wisconsin (2015)
  • Minor in Social Justice (Prejudice and Discrimination), University of Wisconsin-Oshkosh, Oshkosh, Wisconsin (2015)
  • Associates of Arts and Science Degree, University of Wisconsin-Washington County, West Bend, Wisconsin (2012)

Research

Brooke is interested in restorative justice as it relates to Forgiveness Therapy and education in the prison system. Her research focuses on exploring the relationship between historical trauma and crime through analyzing the relationship between characteristics of incarcerated individuals’ stories of injustice and attitudes as related to trauma occurring throughout the life span.  Brooke is currently working with Dr. Robert Enright, founder of the International Forgiveness Institute and leader in the field of moral development and forgiveness education.

Teaching

Taycheedah Correctional Institution, Fond du Lac, Wisconsin (2015)

Teaching Assistant, Abnormal Psychology, UW-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin (2017)

Teaching Assistant, Social Psychology, UW-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin (2017)

Teaching Assistant, Human Development-Childhood through Adolescence, UW-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin (2017)

Teaching Assistant, Cognition in Health and Society, UW-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin  (2018)

Teaching Assistant, Critical Issues in Child Psychopathology, UW-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin (2018)

Teaching Assistant, Human Development in Adolescence, UW-Madison (2019)

Publications

  • Enright, R., Erzar, T., Gambaro, M., Komoski, M., O’Boyle, J., Reed, G., Song, J., Teslik, M., Wollner, B., Yao, Z., Yu, L. (2016). Proposing Forgiveness Therapy for those in Prison: An Intervention Strategy for Reducing Anger and Promoting Psychological Health. Journal of Forensic Psychology,01(04). doi:10.4172/2475-319x.1000116
  • Yu, L., Gambaro, M., Komoski, M., Song, J., Song, M., Teslik, M., Wollner, B., Enright, R. (2018). The Silent Injustices for Men in Maximum Security Prison and the Need for Forgiveness Therapy: Two Case Studies. Journal of Forensic Psychology, 3: 137. Doi: 10.4172/2475-319X.1000137

Presentations

  • Yu, L., Gambaro, M., Komoski, M. C., Song, M. J., Song, M., Wollner, B., & Enright, R. D. (November 2019). Examining the Efficacy of Forgiveness Therapy within a Maximum-Security Prison: Reducing Anger and Promoting Psychological Health. Paper presentation at the 45th annual Association for Moral Education (AME) Conference, Seattle, Washington, U.S.
  • Wollner, B.L., (2018, November). Examining injustices prior to crime: a pilot study in a men’s maximum security prison Poster presented at the annual Association for Moral Education Conference, Barcelona, Spain.
  • Wollner, B.L., (2017, November). Injustice prior to a maximum security prison sentence. Poster presented at the annual Association for Moral Education Conference, St. Louis, Missouri.
  • Reed, G. & Wollner, B.L., (2017, September). Forgiveness therapy. Orally presented as part of the Professional Growth Series at Ottawa University, Brookfield, Wisconsin.
  • Wollner, B.L., (2015, April). Peace, justice, and understanding in northern ireland. Poster presented at the annual Celebration of Scholarship, University of Wisconsin-Oshkosh, Oshkosh, Wisconsin.
  • Wollner, B.L., & Helmers, M. (2015, April). Peace, justice, and understanding in northern ireland. Poster presented at the annual Posters in the Rotunda Showcase, Madison, Wisconsin.
  • Wollner, B.L., (2014, November). Women of the federal bureau of prisons. Orally presented at the annual American Society of Criminology Conference, San Francisco, California.
  • Wollner, B.L., (2014, October). Peace, justice, and understanding in northern ireland. Poster presented at the annual National McNair Conference, Delevan, Wisconsin.
  • Wollner, B.L., (2014, September). Peace, justice, and understanding in northern ireland. Orally presented at the annual McNair Scholars Showcase, University of Wisconsin-Oshkosh, Oshkosh, Wisconsin.
  • Wollner, B.L., (2014, September). Peace, justice and understanding in  northern ireland. Poster presented at the annual McNair Scholars Showcase, University of Wisconsin-Oshkosh, Oshkosh, Wisconsin.

LAI WONG

Lai Wong is a graduate student under the supervision of Dr. Robert Enright, Department of Educational Psychology.  Email: lywong3@wisc.edu.

Research

Her research aims to turn theories and philosophy into practices for the well-being of human development.  Her current research interests include moral agency development as a means for citizenship development and prevention for gang involvement, the development of a just and merciful community for school safety, as well as forgiveness education.

Education

  • University of Wisconsin-Madison, MS, Educational Psychology/Human Development
  • Northeastern University, BSBA, cum laude, Business Administration in Human Resource Management and Marketing

Other Experiences

  • An active member of Enright Forgiveness Lab, JMC mentor, principal intern, substitute teacher, founder of 3E, trainer on the impacts of prejudice and bias in the workplace, and EEO/AA and diversity policy analyst and strategist.

Presentations

  • Wong, L. (June 27, 2019). Evil no more: 14K-Triad gang leader Teddy and the psychology of moral agency development.  Presentation at the 13th Annual Asia Pacific Network for Moral Education Annual Conference, Bali, Indonesia.
  • Wong, L. (November 3, 2017).  Distinctive qualities of excellent teachers. Presentation at Association of Moral Education Conference, St. Louis, Missouri.
  • Aguinaga, A., Ben, A. G., Hamman, L. E., Lindemann, A., & Wong, L. (May 23, 2014). Crossroads of pink cobblestone around the ivory tower: female students reflect on their career journey.  Presentation at the Tenth International Congress of Qualitative Inquiry, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Illinois.
  • Wong, L. (October 24, 2013). The sustaining power of moral agency in positive youth development.  Presentation at Association of Moral Education Conference, Montreal, Canada.
  • Enright, R., Wong, L., Hirshberg, M. & Jiang, L. (November 8, 2012). Just and merciful community.  Poster presentation at Association of Moral Education Conference, San Antonio, Texas.

Publication in Preparation

  • Distinctive qualities of excellent teachers

LIFAN YU

Lifan Yu is a Ph.D. candidate from the Department of Educational Psychology, Human

Development area. She graduated from the Psychology Department at Tsinghua University (Beijing, China) with her B.S. degree. Her research interests mainly focus on how past injustices influence individuals’ social-emotional attitudes, moral-behavioral changes, and psychological well-being, as well as proposing forgiveness therapy in prison context. She also has experience in teaching Statistics and Psychological Developmental courses.

QI ZHANG

Qi Zhang is a second-year PhD student in the Human Development area of Educational Psychology. She previously received her BA in social work from Beijing Institute of Technology. After graduating, she decided to focus on people’s mental health and attended the Peking University Health Science Center as an graduate student and  received MS in applied psychology in clinical direction. Qi’s research interests are pathology of children’s internalizing and externalizing symptoms and the effects of forgiveness on children’s mental disorder in family.

Education

BA, Social Work, Beijing Institute of Technology, China

MS, Applied Psychology, Peking University Health Science Center, China

Publications

Zhang, Q.,  Wu, R., Hao, S., et al (2017). Mediating effect of self-esteem on relationship between perceived social support and depression in college students. China Journal of Health Psychology,25(11):1683-1687.

Zhang, Q., Wang, H., Zhang, X., et al. (2017). Investigation of clinical and counseling psychology graduate students’ cognition and attitudes of psychometric ethics. Chinese Mental Health Journal, 31(1), 30-34.

Zhang X., Wei, H., Zhang, Q., et al.(2017). Interview